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What's the best way of writing:

if(!$this->uri->segment('4') && $this->uri->segment('4') != 0)

This is far too long winded. Just need to check if a string is set, even if it's 0.

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@Shakti: empty has the exact same problem that the OP does now, in that it accepts "0" as "empty" (amongst lots of other things). In fact, notice: "empty() is the opposite of (boolean) var". That is, !empty is what the OP is already doing. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is far too long winded. Just need to check if a string is set, even if it's 0.

How about checking for the length of the string?

if (strlen($this->uri->segment('4')) > 0)

EDIT For explicitness, I've added > 0, so it may be a little more descriptive what it is exactly you expect. This isn't necessary, however.

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Yea, I suspect that this will be the solution. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:21
    
You have a typo (duly fixed). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:39
    
@Tomalak You're right, thanks for the fix, much appreciated. –  Berry Langerak Jun 7 '11 at 12:54
    
Fixed another typo (strlen was closed in the wrong spot). –  evolve Jun 7 '11 at 13:00

isset()

EDIT: nope this is not a var its a method..

Just need to check if a string is set, even if it's 0.

if($this->uri->segment('4') != '')

but i dont think this is what you are trying to do.

it depends on what this method returns and what you try to accomplish.

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-1 The result of a function call is always set. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:14
    
What he said :) –  Michael Watson Jun 7 '11 at 12:14
    
yeah i noticed too.. edited answer. –  Rufinus Jun 7 '11 at 12:17
    
@Rubinus: Your edit seems unlikely to be helpful for what the OP describes as "a string". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:18
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal yeah i know. but Questionair is really unprecise what he wants to know and what the method returns. (he is checking against != 0 but wants to know for a string...) –  Rufinus Jun 7 '11 at 12:21

The first clause isn't "correct" anyway, as you've discovered by having to write the second one. You also have to consider FALSE and the empty string (""). Code like if ($var) is lazy and, usually, wrong.

The correct approach for testing a variable is the PHP function isset. However, assuming $this->uri->segment('4') is a function call, the result will always be "set". It can never not be set. So it seems unlikely to be that you can do much here.

What criteria are you really looking for?

Perhaps your function segment returns null? So write if (!is_null($this->uri->segment('4'))).

Or perhaps you're looking for the empty string? So write if ($this->uri->segment('4') != "").

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I'm looking to test if an ID has been passed in the 4th segment of the uri. This happens before I check that ID against a table in my database. –  Michael Watson Jun 7 '11 at 12:17
    
@Michael: I am not familiar with the object you are using (in fact, you have not provided any information about it). But it does sound like you just want to test for an empty string. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:19
    
I know, rushed question, my bad. :) In more detail, this is codeigniter's uri helper function. So we'd head to site.com/edit_page/4 and it will hook up to the page details in the database. Could I ask, what are the repercussions of if($var), and why is it lazy? –  Michael Watson Jun 7 '11 at 12:26
    
@Michael: The repercussions are what you have run into: if (!$var) does NOT mean if (!isset($var)), and similar is true for your if (!foo()) case. It's lazy because there's no reason not to write the correct code in the first place (for those that know about it, that is), but people do it "to save on typing". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '11 at 12:27
    
"It's lazy because there's no reason not to write the correct code". If your intent is to accept every value that doesn't evaluate to (bool) false, e.g. all values % [null, false, 0, "0"], it is a perfectly correct statement. I do agree though that I like my statement expressive of what I'm expecting. –  Berry Langerak Jun 7 '11 at 12:32

1

    if ( strlen($this->uri->segment('4')) )
    {}

2

    if ( strlen($this->uri->segment('4')) !== "" )
    {}
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