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If there are two absolutely positioned divs on a page, the innermost of which has content that should be rendered as a table, Firefox 3.6.x & 4.x, Chrome 13.x and Opera 11.x all resort to crushing the content.

Test case:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
  <head>
    <title>Nested Absolutes</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div style=" position: absolute; background-color: green;">
      <div style="position: absolute;">
        <div style="display: table;">
          <div style="display: table-column; width: 15px;"></div>
          <div style="display: table-column;"></div>
          <div style="display: table-row;">
            <div style="display: table-cell; background-color: blue;"></div>
            <div style="display: table-cell;">
              Banana Fritter
            </div>
          </div>
          <div style="display: table-row;">
            <div style="display: table-cell; background-color: red;"></div>
            <div style="display: table-cell;">
              Cherry Pie
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Expected output ([C] to mean a block of colour C):

[B]Banana Fritter
[R]Cherry Pie

Will produce rendered output:

Banana
Fritter
Cherry
Pie

The divs with an explicitly styled width of 15px have been eliminated from view and any text context has had line breaks unnecessarily applied.

If either of the outer divs has its position changed to "relative", the layout of the content is restored to the expected layout.

Why does the use of two nested, absolutely positioned divs provoke a browser's layout engine into rendering the child divs with supplied styling ignored and the content forced into as small a space as possible?

** UPDATE **

A simpler example that avoids the complications of tables (fiddle):

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
  <head>
    <title>Nested Absolutes</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div style=" position: absolute; background-color: green;">
      <div style="position: absolute;">
        <div>
          Banana Fritter
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Expected output:

Banana Fritter

Rendered output:

Banana
Fritter

share|improve this question
9  
That's a lot of hoops to jump through to simulate a table. I know the mantra is "don't use tables" but everyone forgets the whole mantra: "don't use tables for layout" If you are representing tabular data, go ahead and use a table. – Stephen Jun 7 '11 at 12:42
    
The example is intended to illustrate an unexpected rendering case, rather than serve as the focus of discussion for the balance of separation in structure and style among delicious dessert options. – Giles Burdett Jun 7 '11 at 13:20
    
If you illustrate the case within a jsfiddle then you might get more of a response. – My Head Hurts Jun 7 '11 at 13:34
    
Thanks for the suggestion, now available as a fiddle – Giles Burdett Jun 7 '11 at 13:39
    
@Stephen : the output would be the same with regular tables (<table>...). – Kraz Jun 7 '11 at 14:36

An element with position: absolute is taken out of the normal flow of the page and positioned at the desired coordinates relative to its containing block.

Since the absolutely positioned element is taken out of the normal flow, the normal document flow behaves as if the element is not there: it closes up the space it would take.

source

You'll get no green background because `; is "empty" : is only child is in absolute aka "not there".

The words are warped because your table is positioned in an element with no space (a table take the space it can take by default). It's like forcing a "width:0%". You won't get any blue nor red for the same reason.

The following will produce similar output :

<div style="width:0px; height:0px">
    <div style="display: table;">
      <div style="display: table-row;">
        <div style="display: table-cell; background-color: blue;"></div>
        <div style="display: table-cell;">
          Banana Fritter
        </div>
      </div>
      <div style="display: table-row;">
        <div style="display: table-cell; background-color: red;"></div>
        <div style="display: table-cell;">
          Cherry Pie
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
</div>

Thanks for the interresting question :)

share|improve this answer
    
If only one containing div is given position "relative", this leaves one remaining containing div that is absolute and out of the normal flow, and despite this remaining absolutely positioned element taking "no space" it will be properly rendered. Forked fiddle here (absolute, relative) and here (relative, absolute). Does this answer account for this? – Giles Burdett Jun 7 '11 at 14:48
    
For (absolute,relative) : The table is in a position:relative div : it can resize it to display its content. For (relative, absolute) : The relative div is empty and everything is in the absolute div, which is also resized to display its content. In the (absolute,absolute) case : your table is in an absolute div which is in an empty div, it got no space to resize. I hope I make sense enough :S – Kraz Jun 7 '11 at 14:51
    
In the (relative, absolute) case, the relative div is empty because the inner absolute div has taken the content out of the normal flow of the relative div. In the (absolute, absolute) case, the second absolute div has also taken the content out of the normal flow of the first div. Both cases result in a zero-sized outer div, how does this affect the rendering of the inner div differently in each case? – Giles Burdett Jun 7 '11 at 15:02
    
In (relative,absolute), the absolute div has space to exist (the outer div is empty but it exist). Not in the (absolute,absolute) case (the outer div is out of context). Hence, different rendering. – Kraz Jun 7 '11 at 15:12

I don't know the exact science behind this, but I take it as a general rule. It's probably deep within some part of the W3C spec

The Table

For starters, your elements collapse because they have no content. Take my JSFiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/qu4P8/

Simply adding a &nbsp; to the empty div's shows the background-colours of choice. Typically, columns on a table are only as wide as the widest table-cell, so it may explain why you don't see any content. Even setting a width will not mean these cell's render. There is no content. This is the key element here.

Double Absolute

I'm not sure why the content collapses, but it kind of makes sense why. The double absolute div seems to lose it's width. The parent div does not have a defined width, so the inner div seems to lose width too. However, I can't think of a case where this style of mark-up would be beneficial.

For instance, they are both absolutely positioned, so you could seperate them out, like something below:

<div style="position:absolute">Content 1</div> 
<div style="position:absolute">Content 2</div>

I see no need for the case you have suggested, that could not be accomplished another way. Everything seems OK here.

share|improve this answer
    
By your reasoning there are table cells which always have no content, therefore they must always collapse regardless of where they occur or how they are styled, which is not what we see. – Giles Burdett Jun 7 '11 at 19:01
    
They have no content, and therefore no height either. try the following `<div style='background:red; width:150px></div>' and see the div is not rendered! add a height and suddenly it does not collapse! no content = no height = no div :-) This applies to table cells too, but with a slight difference. The table-cell will collapse in the double absolute scenario regardless of the width you set! a <div> will not do this. This must be a 'feature' of tables and double absolute positioned stuff. (Play around with the JS Fiddle, it's is very hard to explain!) – Mig Jun 7 '11 at 19:24

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