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I'm studying Threads in Java, and it make me curious about how to control synchronize access between static and instance methods of class, since synchronization of static methods in a class is independent from the synchronization of instance methods on objects of the class.

At the moment, I can't find any situation in real life, so I make a assumption :

Two class A and B, class A have static methods with a formal parameter of class B, and instance methods do too. Then I create two threads to execute concurrently two methods of A.

How many ways to keep the state of the below obj is always consistent ?

class B { ... }
class A {
      public synchronized void instanceMethod(B obj){ ... }; 
      public static synchronized void staticMethod(B obj){ ... };

      public static void main(String[] args){
            B obj = new B();
            // create a Thread to modify the state of obj with A's instanceMethod
            // create a Thread to modify the state of obj with A's staticMethod
      }
}

Thanks in advanced.

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4 Answers

A static method for A cannot alter the this state of an object A so you don't have a problem there.

A non-static method can modify a static field. However if you avoid doing this, and only use static methods to modify static fields, you can synchronized each method and it will work correctly.

It doesn't make sense to lock on one object and modify an unrelated object. If you are going to modify B, its methods should be synchronized and you might not need to have synchronized methods on A.

Can you write a clearer example which would compile?

class B { 
      public synchronized alter() { };
}
class A {
      public void instanceMethod(B obj){ obj.alter(); }; 
      public static void staticMethod(B obj){ obj.alter(); };

      public static void main(String[] args){
            B obj = new B();
            // create a Thread to modify the state of obj with A's instanceMethod
            // create a Thread to modify the state of obj with A's staticMethod
            obj.alter();
      }
}
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But the static method can alter an object provided as argument, and that's the case here. –  Fabian Barney Jun 7 '11 at 13:02
    
Its an instance of B which is passed, not A. It can alter B, and it may or may not have synchronized methods. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 7 '11 at 13:04
    
He wants obj of Type B to be synchronized when it is passed to different methods which are manipulating obj in different threads at the same time. That is how I understood the question. –  Fabian Barney Jun 7 '11 at 13:09
1  
This seems the best solution if you are able to modify class B. –  Atreys Jun 7 '11 at 13:15
    
"It doesn't make sense to lock on one object and modify an unrelated object." This is not true. It has advantages to synchronize over an explicit object rather over the object itself. The object itself may be accessible for others which may synchronize over that object too which can break your desired behaviour. This is not the case when you have your private mutex/dummy object to lock on. Some companies (i.e. Microsoft for C#) explicitly warn to lock on this what synchronized keyword in Java effectivly is. –  Fabian Barney Jun 7 '11 at 13:16
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Synchronize over the concurrent object "B".

public void instanceMethod(B obj) {
    synchronized(obj) {
        //no other thread will enter a synchronized block on 'obj' since we leave it
        ...
        obj.doSomething();
        ...
        obj.doSomethingElse(); //I can trust here that no other thread manipulated 'obj' since 2 lines before.
        ...
    }
}

Same for the static method.

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I like this approach, but it would produce a different effect than synchronizing a whole method. The static method could be called twice with two different B objects. If you synchronize the static method, and synchronize over the concurrent object B, would that be appropriate? –  Atreys Jun 7 '11 at 13:09
    
@Atreys, if the different threads operate on different B instances, then what is the harm here? What data of B could be mutated that would be affected by a different instance? The original question is very had to answer without more concrete examples of what B looks like, what the thread-safety dangers are, etc - questions like this are impossible to answer in the abstract because every synchronization detail is highly specific to the situation at hand –  matt b Jun 7 '11 at 13:25
    
As far as I understood the question only the passed 'obj' should be left consistent. So there is no problem with parallel execution if it's not the same 'obj' - in most cases it's really what you like then. When you have to synchronize over both then it's going more complicated and you have cascaded synchronize blocks and all alerts for possible dead locks should ring. Be very careful what you're doing in that case ... –  Fabian Barney Jun 7 '11 at 13:25
    
@matt b, agreed. hard to answer without a more concrete spec. If the static method were originally synchronized because of modifications to B as well as it's own personal reasons, then you'd want it synchronized. I agree, though, that nothing in the question should suggest that is the case except that the static method was synchronized. –  Atreys Jun 7 '11 at 13:38
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synchronize on a static lock object instead of synchronizing the method calls. This puts extra bookkeeping responsibility on you if you want to introduce other methods synchronizing with these methods: grab the lock for them as well.

class B { ... }
class A {
      static Object myLock = new Object();
      public void instanceMethod(B obj){ synchronized(myLock) {...} }; 
      public static void staticMethod(B obj){ synchronized(myLock) {...} };

      public static void main(String[] args){
            B obj = new B();
            // create a Thread to modify the state of obj with A's instanceMethod
            // create a Thread to modify the state of obj with A's staticMethod
      }
}
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2  
This means you could modify B directly from the main(). IMHO: This approach is overly complex and error prone. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 7 '11 at 13:06
    
+1 because having an explicit lock object makes it often more robust but is not always adequate. You do not have to care about others synchronizing over the same object and destroying your desired behaviour with having your own locking object. –  Fabian Barney Jun 7 '11 at 13:30
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It sounds like you're worried about the state of B obj... Instead of synchronizing the methods of A, have the instance methods of B do the proper locking internally to each instance of B. Otherwise there could be a class C, that doesn't follow the locking rules and you'd wind up in an inconsistent state again.

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