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Using PHP, I'd like to convert a string containing a Roman number into its integer representation. I need this because I need to make calculations on them.

Wikipedia on Roman numerals

It would suffice to only recognize the basic Roman numeral characters, like:

$roman_values=array(
    'I' => 1,
    'V' => 5,
    'X' => 10,
    'L' => 50,
    'C' => 100,
    'D' => 500,
    'M' => 1000,
);

That means the highest possible number is 3999 (MMMCMXCIX). I will use N to represent zero, other than that only positive integers are supported.

I cannot use the PEAR library for Roman numbers.

I found this great question on SO on how to test whether the string contains a valid Roman numeral:

How do you match only valid roman numerals with a regular expression?

What would be the best way of coding this?

share|improve this question
    
Why can't you use the PEAR library? Surely you could at least look at the code? It's under the same license as PHP. –  Andrew Aylett Jun 7 '11 at 13:11
    
Because pear is not wide-available, as example can not be installed in php command line environment. And is not allowed by security reasons :) –  publikz.com Jun 7 '11 at 13:14
    
@stereofrog The PEAR Package Manager is not installed on the server and I don't have rights to install it. And to be honest, it is not really worth for this one simple task. –  kapa Jun 7 '11 at 13:17
    
+1 Nice question –  andyb Jun 7 '11 at 14:05
    
@stereofrog You could consider adding this as an answer. –  kapa Jun 7 '11 at 14:26

9 Answers 9

up vote 23 down vote accepted

How about this:

$romans = array(
    'M' => 1000,
    'CM' => 900,
    'D' => 500,
    'CD' => 400,
    'C' => 100,
    'XC' => 90,
    'L' => 50,
    'XL' => 40,
    'X' => 10,
    'IX' => 9,
    'V' => 5,
    'IV' => 4,
    'I' => 1,
);

$roman = 'MMMCMXCIX';
$result = 0;

foreach ($romans as $key => $value) {
    while (strpos($roman, $key) === 0) {
        $result += $value;
        $roman = substr($roman, strlen($key));
    }
}
echo $result;

which should output 3999 for the supplied $roman. It seems to work for my limited testing:

MCMXC = 1990
MM = 2000
MMXI = 2011
MCMLXXV = 1975

You might want to do some validation first as well :-)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Nice approach, I like it. I did not think about building up the array this way. –  kapa Jun 7 '11 at 14:10
1  
clean code :) very straightforward. +1 –  Jay Milagroso Jun 9 '11 at 10:40
    
I like how short your solution is, but you need to add a few items to $romans, since, for example, MIM and MDCCCCLXXXXVIIII both could represent 1999 (because there's not a consensus on what constitutes a valid Roman number). –  akTed Feb 3 '13 at 6:43

I am not sure whether you've got ZF or not, but in case you (or any of you who's reading this) do here is my snippet:

$number = new Zend_Measure_Number('MCMLXXV', Zend_Measure_Number::ROMAN);
$number->convertTo (Zend_Measure_Number::DECIMAL);
echo $number->getValue();
share|improve this answer
    
Great! Hope the OP is ok to use Zend for this. +1 –  Matthieu Napoli Jun 7 '11 at 13:41
    
oh my. Zend has really everything –  dynamic Jun 10 '11 at 16:43

This is the one I came up with, I added the validity check as well.

class RomanNumber {
    //array of roman values
    public static $roman_values=array(
        'I' => 1, 'V' => 5, 
        'X' => 10, 'L' => 50,
        'C' => 100, 'D' => 500,
        'M' => 1000,
    );
    //values that should evaluate as 0
    public static $roman_zero=array('N', 'nulla');
    //Regex - checking for valid Roman numerals
    public static $roman_regex='/^M{0,3}(CM|CD|D?C{0,3})(XC|XL|L?X{0,3})(IX|IV|V?I{0,3})$/';

    //Roman numeral validation function - is the string a valid Roman Number?
    static function IsRomanNumber($roman) {
         return preg_match(self::$roman_regex, $roman) > 0;
    }

    //Conversion: Roman Numeral to Integer
    static function Roman2Int ($roman) {
        //checking for zero values
        if (in_array($roman, self::$roman_zero)) {
            return 0;
        }
        //validating string
        if (!self::IsRomanNumber($roman)) {
            return false;
        }

        $values=self::$roman_values;
        $result = 0;
        //iterating through characters LTR
        for ($i = 0, $length = strlen($roman); $i < $length; $i++) {
            //getting value of current char
            $value = $values[$roman[$i]];
            //getting value of next char - null if there is no next char
            $nextvalue = !isset($roman[$i + 1]) ? null : $values[$roman[$i + 1]];
            //adding/subtracting value from result based on $nextvalue
            $result += (!is_null($nextvalue) && $nextvalue > $value) ? -$value : $value;
        }
        return $result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Copyrights is for this blog (btw!) http://scriptsense.blogspot.com/2010/03/php-function-number-to-roman-and-roman.html

<?php

function roman2number($roman){
    $conv = array(
        array("letter" => 'I', "number" => 1),
        array("letter" => 'V', "number" => 5),
        array("letter" => 'X', "number" => 10),
        array("letter" => 'L', "number" => 50),
        array("letter" => 'C', "number" => 100),
        array("letter" => 'D', "number" => 500),
        array("letter" => 'M', "number" => 1000),
        array("letter" => 0, "number" => 0)
    );
    $arabic = 0;
    $state = 0;
    $sidx = 0;
    $len = strlen($roman);

    while ($len >= 0) {
        $i = 0;
        $sidx = $len;

        while ($conv[$i]['number'] > 0) {
            if (strtoupper(@$roman[$sidx]) == $conv[$i]['letter']) {
                if ($state > $conv[$i]['number']) {
                    $arabic -= $conv[$i]['number'];
                } else {
                    $arabic += $conv[$i]['number'];
                    $state = $conv[$i]['number'];
                }
            }
            $i++;
        }

        $len--;
    }

    return($arabic);
}


function number2roman($num,$isUpper=true) {
    $n = intval($num);
    $res = '';

    /*** roman_numerals array ***/
    $roman_numerals = array(
        'M' => 1000,
        'CM' => 900,
        'D' => 500,
        'CD' => 400,
        'C' => 100,
        'XC' => 90,
        'L' => 50,
        'XL' => 40,
        'X' => 10,
        'IX' => 9,
        'V' => 5,
        'IV' => 4,
        'I' => 1
    );

    foreach ($roman_numerals as $roman => $number)
    {
        /*** divide to get matches ***/
        $matches = intval($n / $number);

        /*** assign the roman char * $matches ***/
        $res .= str_repeat($roman, $matches);

        /*** substract from the number ***/
        $n = $n % $number;
    }

    /*** return the res ***/
    if($isUpper) return $res;
    else return strtolower($res);
}

/* TEST */
echo $s=number2roman(1965,true);
echo "\n and bacK:\n";
echo roman2number($s);


?>
share|improve this answer
    
Without spending too much time trying to grok the algorithm, it appears flawed - it's valid to write 800 as CCM (though generally considered bad style) as well as DCCC, the method should be that any digit followed by a digit of higher numerical value should be substracted from the latter instead of added. –  symcbean Jun 7 '11 at 13:23
    
Formatted this code in case someone wants to read it. –  kapa Jun 9 '11 at 9:12

Quick idea - go through the Roman number from right to left, if value of $current (more to the left) is smaller than $previous, then subtract it from the result, if larger, then add it.

$romanValues=array(
    'I' => 1,
    'V' => 5,
    'X' => 10,
    'L' => 50,
    'C' => 100,
    'D' => 500,
    'M' => 1000,
);
$roman = 'MMMCMXCIX';

// RTL
$arabic = 0;
$prev = null;
for ( $n = strlen($roman) - 1; $n >= 0; --$n ) {
    $curr = $roman[$n];
    if ( is_null($prev) ) {
        $arabic += $romanValues[$roman[$n]];
    } else {
        $arabic += $romanValues[$prev] > $romanValues[$curr] ? -$romanValues[$curr] : +$romanValues[$curr];
    }
    $prev = $curr;
}
echo $arabic, "\n";

// LTR
$arabic = 0;
$romanLength = strlen($roman);
for ( $n = 0; $n < $romanLength; ++$n ) {
    if ( $n === $romanLength - 1 ) {
        $arabic += $romanValues[$roman[$n]];
    } else {
        $arabic += $romanValues[$roman[$n]] < $romanValues[$roman[$n+1]] ? -$romanValues[$roman[$n]] : +$romanValues[$roman[$n]];
    }
}
echo $arabic, "\n";

Some validation of roman number should also be added, though you said that you already have found how to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Works fine. Does it matter whether we go LTR or RTL? –  kapa Jun 9 '11 at 9:22
    
Yes, in this case it does matter, as meaning of "current letter" depends on the value of "next letter" - if next letter is smaller or the same as current, then add current to the result, if next is larger, then subtract current from the result. If we go RTL, we store "next letter" in $prev variable, so it is always accessible with exception of first (right-most) letter where basic is_null($prev) check is sufficient. If we go LTR, we have to check value of next letter as well as existance of next letter. –  binaryLV Jun 9 '11 at 9:28
    
Keep in mind though that this might work also for invalid roman letters, e.g., IVL will be treated as -1-5+50 and result in 44, which should be written as XLIV. Therefore, validation of number's structure should be added, as noted in answer. –  binaryLV Jun 9 '11 at 9:32
    
@binaryLV What do you mean by If we go LTR, we have to check value of next letter as well as existance of next letter. You're using RTL, but you still run a check on the value of the next letter (ternary). What else would be necessary LTR? –  kapa Jun 9 '11 at 9:39
    
That check just has to be done differently. In RTL, you can use value from previous loop iteration, as "current" from current iteration will be "previous" in next iteration. In LTR, in every iteration you have get value which will be "current" in next iteration, as it is not stored anywhere yet. I've updated answer with LTR version of this code. –  binaryLV Jun 9 '11 at 9:52

Just stumbled across this beauty and have to post it all over:

function roman($N)
{
    $c = 'IVXLCDM';
    for ($a = 5, $b = $s = ''; $N; $b++, $a ^= 7)
    {
        for (
            $o = $N % $a, $N = $N / $a ^ 0;

            $o--;

            $s = $c[$o > 2 ? $b + $N - ($N &= -2) + $o = 1 : $b] . $s
        );
    }
    return $s;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should post a link where you have stumbled across this :). It seems to be fun, but not a great example of descriptive variable names. –  kapa Feb 19 '13 at 12:06
    
Had to format it for readability, the original was in code, but I just searched for php roman IVXLCDM and actually found the original on the PHP manual (that formatting is the same as on our code) a shout out to JR along with 100 internet points! –  Daniel Feb 19 '13 at 13:18

Define your own schema! (optional)

function rom2arab($rom,$letters=array()){
    if(empty($letters)){
        $letters=array('M'=>1000,
                       'D'=>500,
                       'C'=>100,
                       'L'=>50,
                       'X'=>10,
                       'V'=>5,
                       'I'=>1);
    }else{
        arsort($letters);
    }
    $arab=0;
    foreach($letters as $L=>$V){
        while(strpos($rom,$L)!==false){
            $l=$rom[0];
            $rom=substr($rom,1);
            $m=$l==$L?1:-1;
            $arab += $letters[$l]*$m;
        }
    }
    return $arab;
}

Inspired by andyb's answer

share|improve this answer

I just wrote this in about 10 mins, it's not perfect, but seems to work for the few test cases I've given it. I'm not enforcing what values are allowed to be subtracted from what, this is just a basic loop that compares the current letter value with the next one in the sequence (if it exists) and then either adds the value or adds the subtracted amount to the total:

$roman = strtolower($_GET['roman']);

$values = array(
'i' => 1,
'v' => 5,
'x' => 10,
'l' => 50,
'c' => 100,
'd' => 500,
'm' => 1000,
);
$total = 0;
for($i=0; $i<strlen($roman); $i++)
{
    $v = $values[substr($roman, $i, 1)];
    $v2 = ($i < strlen($roman))?$values[substr($roman, $i+1, 1)]:0;

    if($v2 && $v < $v2)
    {
        $total += ($v2 - $v);
        $i++;
    }
    else
        $total += $v;

}

echo $total;
share|improve this answer
1  
You should test your code with error reporting on (or suppress it as necessary), it throws a Notice: Undefined offset: 0 on your $v2... line most executions. –  akTed Feb 3 '13 at 7:31

I'm late to the party, but here's mine. Assumes valid Numerals in the string, but doesn't test for a valid Roman number, whatever that is...there doesn't seem to be a consensus. This function will work for Roman numbers like VC (95), or MIM (1999), or MMMMMM (6000).

function roman2dec( $roman ) {
    $numbers = array(
        'I' => 1,
        'V' => 5,
        'X' => 10,
        'L' => 50,
        'C' => 100,
        'D' => 500,
        'M' => 1000,
    );

    $roman = strtoupper( $roman );
    $length = strlen( $roman );
    $counter = 0;
    $dec = 0;
    while ( $counter < $length ) {
        if ( ( $counter + 1 < $length ) && ( $numbers[$roman[$counter]] < $numbers[$roman[$counter + 1]] ) ) {
            $dec += $numbers[$roman[$counter + 1]] - $numbers[$roman[$counter]];
            $counter += 2;
        } else {
            $dec += $numbers[$roman[$counter]];
            $counter++;
        }
    }
    return $dec;
}
share|improve this answer

protected by kapa Feb 21 '13 at 8:47

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