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How should I handle InterruptedException while joining other threads, assuming I don't actually anticipate being interrupted, and there is no sensible thing to do? Just swallow the exception?

try
{
    t.join();
    u.join();
}
catch (InterruptedException e)
{
    // should not happen
}

Or should I put each join in its separate try/catch, so if an InterruptedExeption does happen while joining t, at least u gets a chance of being joined?

try
{
    t.join();
}
catch (InterruptedException e)
{
    // should not happen
}
try
{
    u.join();
}
catch (InterruptedException e)
{
    // should not happen
}

Or should I defensively swallow the exceptions in a loop, so I will eventually join both threads, even if some malicious guy tries to interrupt me?

while (true)
{
    try
    {
        t.join();
        break;
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
        // no way, Jose!
    }
}
while (true)
{
    try
    {
        u.join();
        break;
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
        // no way, Jose!
    }
}

On a side note, is there any case where InterruptedExeption doesn't make my code look ugly? :)

share|improve this question
    
Why do you handle concurrency this way? Why should not you use fork/join? - download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/… –  Manimaran Selvan Jun 7 '11 at 13:14
2  
@Manimaran - I agree it is better to use java.util.concurrent, but fork/join is not available until Java 7. –  Paul Cager Jun 7 '11 at 13:20
    
@Paul - Though it is not released yet, the concept is what I was talking about! We use a similar type of approach using the current(1.6) java.util.concurrent. We latch threads using Callable, Future and CountDownLatch. I'll edit my comment a bit to convey my point correctly! –  Manimaran Selvan Jun 8 '11 at 8:18
    
Oops, time up! I couldn't edit :-) –  Manimaran Selvan Jun 8 '11 at 8:19
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If something shouldn't happen, you probably want to know if it ever does happen - and the best way of making it obvious is often to throw a RuntimeException of some description (e.g. IllegalStateException). If you're not anticipating the possibility of being interrupted, that suggests the system is in a state you're not really happy to support, so I wouldn't then try to keep going - aborting quickly is often the best option here.

You may want to write a helper method which does this for you, to make the calling code cleaner.

share|improve this answer
    
Fail fast is a good principal, if you can afford a server randomly restarting when it encounters an uncaught unchecked exception. –  Rob Elsner Jun 7 '11 at 14:01
    
@Rob: A server should usually catch anything thrown by each request. You don't want the server to go down just because there's a NullPointerException somewhere. Of course if all the requests start failing (or just a significant proportion), it's worth having monitoring which will start using a different server and restart the bad one... and possibly page someone. –  Jon Skeet Jun 7 '11 at 14:02
    
uncaught NPE will just make the thread exit but virtually any server has some handler (to log at least). I am not a fan of hard process restart b/c there is a bug somewhere. –  bestsss Jun 13 '11 at 10:34
    
@bestsss: But that's my point - the process wouldn't restart. That request would be aborted, which is probably the right thing to do. –  Jon Skeet Jun 13 '11 at 10:35
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