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00000010- 00 11 50 44  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 58 44 [..PD..........XD]
00000011- 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 80 44  00 00 00 00 [...........D....]
00000012- 00 00 00 00  00 11 88 44  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 [.......D........]
00000013- 00 11 90 44  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 98 44 [...D...........D]
00000014- 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 C0 44  00 00 00 00 [...........D....]

Need to extract the hex values mentioned below and copy it to a new file -

00 11 50 44  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 58 44 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 80 44  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 11 88 44  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 11 90 44  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 98 44 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 11 C0 44  00 00 00 00
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3 Answers 3

Assuming you've got all your hex data in a variable called $input, you can get a list of hex digits like this:

foreach line [split $input \n] {
    foreach c [scan $line %*x-%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x%x] {
        if {$c ne ""} {
            lappend out [format %x $c]
        }
    }
}

After that, $out contains a list of hex digits. Use it wisely.

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Here is another approach, which makes the following assumptions:

  1. Each line starts with an offset, which we can discard
  2. Also, each line ends with an ASCII presentation, which we also discard
  3. That means, for each line, we only take items 1 .. end-1
  4. That the variable $input holds many lines of hex dump

Without further ado:

set hexList {}
foreach line [split $input "\n"] {
    set hexList [concat $hexList [lrange $line 1 16]]
}   
puts $hexList; # hexList now contains all the hex digits
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My TCL is a bit rusty but a very naive approach would be:

# Parse all hex numbers from your input variable into hexList
set hexList [regexp -all -inline -- {\d{2}(?:\s{1,2})} $input]
# Replace some spaces to get the expected output and store it into hexData
regsub -all -- {\s{3}} [join $hexList] { } hexData
# Write hexData into your file..
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I wouldn't use that; could get tricked by the right-hand side of the hex dump. –  Donal Fellows Jun 7 '11 at 14:32

Your Answer

 
discard

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