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The answers to this question describe how to fake input to <STDIN>. My goal is similar to that question: my unit test needs to fake input to <>.

When I apply the same technique to fake input to <>, it doesn't work. The introductory-level explanations of <> led me to believe that it was reading from STDIN when no files are given on the command line, but this doesn't seem to be the case.

The sample I'm trying to make work:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;
use Carp;
use English qw( -no_match_vars );

sub fake1 {
    my $fakeinput = "asdf\n";
    open my $stdin, '<', \$fakeinput
      or croak "Cannot open STDIN to read from string: $ERRNO";
    local *STDIN = $stdin;

    my $line = <>;
    print "fake1 line is $line\n";

    return 0;
}

sub fake2 {
    my $fakeinput = "asdf\n";
    open my $stdin, '<', \$fakeinput
      or croak "Cannot open STDIN to read from string: $ERRNO";
    local *STDIN = $stdin;

    my $line = <STDIN>;
    print "fake2 line is $line\n";

    return 0;
}

fake1();
fake2();

fake2 works, fake1 does not. A sample session (the "qwerty" is me typing):

$ perl /tmp/diamond.pl
qwerty
fake1 line is qwerty

fake2 line is asdf

My questions:

  1. How can I fake input to <>?
  2. What's the difference between <> and <STDIN> when no files are given on the command line? (I.e. Why does the technique in the linked question work for <STDIN> but not for <>?)

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Reading the documentation for perlop (at I/O operators) more carefully, it looks like <> uses magic. There's a relevant example there that modifies @ARGV, but I'm not sure my test can reliably guarantee that it is the first instance of <>, or that modifying @ARGV is safe. – bstpierre Jun 7 '11 at 13:38
    
I don't understand why not to just use local @ARGV = .... – tchrist Jun 7 '11 at 18:53
    
@tchrist - How would that work? – bstpierre Jun 8 '11 at 2:26
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Try this in your first test:

open ARGV, '<', \$fakeinput
      or croak "Cannot open STDIN to read from string: $ERRNO";

my $line = <>;
print "fake1 line is $line\n";

This has the disadvantage of not being "local" - no idea if you can make it local or not. (You can do that several times though, resetting before each test.)

share|improve this answer
2  
Perfect. In fact, all I needed to change was local *ARGV = $stdin;. Thanks! The key from the manual appears to be "<> is just a synonym for <ARGV>, which is magical." (The "magical" part scares me a little, but it seems to be working for the moment.) – bstpierre Jun 7 '11 at 13:44
2  
Actually, <> is shorthand for readline( *ARGV );. See perldoc -f readline for details. – shawnhcorey Jun 7 '11 at 16:21

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