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I am working with the PBS queue on a server. I want to submit several jobs automatically and therefore need to replace a variable with a path. Since it is not possible to get arguments into a running script running with the queue, I want to replace the shell variables that are normally used with hardcoded parameters.

What I need is:

#! /bin/sh
#PBS -N runme_$file
#PBS -o $file.out
#PBS -e $file..err
#PBS -q batch
#PBS -j oe
#PBS -m abe
#PBS -r n
#PBS -l nodes=1:ppn=1
#PBS -l walltime=24:00:00

/home/example/proggie script $file $parameter2
echo "DONE"

replacing $file with '/tmp/output', so it should be converted to:

#! /bin/sh
#PBS -N runme_/tmp/output
#PBS -o /tmp/output.out
#PBS -e /tmp/output.err
#PBS -q batch
#PBS -j oe
#PBS -m abe
#PBS -r n
#PBS -l nodes=1:ppn=1
#PBS -l walltime=24:00:00

/home/example/proggie script /tmp/output $parameter2
/home/example2/proggie2 /tmp/output
echo "DONE"

The PBS part is important because it hinders usage of parameters. So i cannot just use $1 and $2 and give the script the parameters it needs via arguments. Instead i have to change the file via a substitution command, then i can submit it to the queuing system. I still want to be able to use the script from the command line, for quick testing.

I tried already using sed, but the possibility of special characters occurring in the file screws up everything. There has to be a better way.

share|improve this question
    
Your problem is not yet clear. Why do you echo but otherwise ignore $1? Where would the value to be substituted for $file come from? Where does the value of $parameter2 come from? Where is PBS run; it seems to be wholly tangential to the question? – Jonathan Leffler Jun 7 '11 at 14:34
    
i edited the question to be clearer. – tarrasch Jun 7 '11 at 14:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using sed:

sed "s%\$file%$file%" script.in > script.out

Using awk (gawk or GNU Awk):

awk '{ gsub(/\$file/, file); print }' file="$file" script.in > script.out

In both examples, I assume that this editing context has the correct value for the file name in $file. I'm also assuming that you don't have any other variables such as $file1 or $filename in the script; if you do have such variables, the regular expressions have to be more complex. I also assume in the sed example that you don't embed percent symbols in your file names.

share|improve this answer
    
the awk line did the trick. however the sed part breaks. anyway thank you. – tarrasch Jun 7 '11 at 14:58

What if you specified $file as ${file}. Then you should be able to use sed. When you say "special characters" I assume you're referring to other $ signs. At least that's the only thing I can see in what you posted.

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