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what I'm trying to do is everytime the program opens the image on a form is different. So I have a simple table with 2 columns ID and ImagePath, how do I create the code so a random record(ImagePath) is chosen, on a form load event or something similar? Rnd is no good, as it will be the same image everytime the database is reopened.

Thanks!

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1  
If rnd returns the same value every time you open the database, then you are probably using it wrongly. How are you using it? – Heinzi Jun 7 '11 at 14:21
    
Just a simple query.... SELECT TOP 1 Images.ID, Images.Path, Rnd([ID]) AS Ran FROM Images ORDER BY Rnd([ID]); – Ben Jun 7 '11 at 14:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

See this article by Susan Harkins on TechRepublic: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/howdoi/how-do-i-retrieve-a-random-set-of-records-in-microsoft-access/149

I used her GetRandomValue function in this query, which returns a different record each time.

SELECT TOP 1 f.id, GetRandomValue(f.id) AS rnd_value
FROM tblFoo AS f
ORDER BY 2;

The function:

Public Function GetRandomValue(fld As Variant)

  Randomize

  GetRandomValue = Rnd(1)

End Function

Caution: This approach requires running a function against every row of the table. It may be tolerable for small to medium tables. But you should not use it with very large tables.

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For relatively small tables this will work fine. If performance is a concern or the table is larger (10,000+ records) have a look at @ray023's solution. – mwolfe02 Jun 7 '11 at 16:50
    
Actually, if you look closely at the benchmarking, I only called each function 10 times. The string concatenation might account for 4 or 5 of those 4,000+ ms but the rest has more to do with calling a VBA function on every row of the table. That's where the thing falls down. – mwolfe02 Jun 7 '11 at 17:09
    
I do tend to agree it's not an issue for his use case. I'm assuming he has a table with a few dozen image filenames and the performance should be perfectly acceptable. My original comment was really intended for future readers who may need to retrieve a random record but have an entirely different use case. – mwolfe02 Jun 7 '11 at 17:11
    
@mwolfe02 I added that warning to my answer. I discarded the comment about concatenation; that was me not seeing forest for the trees. Once you mentioned "function on every row of table", the forest became visible to me. :-) – HansUp Jun 7 '11 at 18:43

Try calling Randomize once -- before the first time you call Rnd. As, the help topic for Rnd says, "Before calling Rnd, use the Randomize statement without an argument to initialize the random-number generator with a seed based on the system timer."

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Man… for whatever reason I struggled with this, so I created a module: Public Function acbGetRandom(varFld As Variant) Randomize acbGetRandom = Rnd End Function Then I added the function to my query, using: RandomID: acbGetRandom([ID]) in the field.. I hope this helps someone! – Ben Jun 7 '11 at 15:24
    
For the purpose of randomizing the "seed" used by Rnd, it's only necessary to call Randomize once. For example, you might call it via an AutoExec macro or startup form. Another approach would be to call it at the start of generating a sequence of pseudo-random numbers, like in ray023's answer. As for the "varFld" argument you added (but didn't use) to your function, this is one way to force the function to be evaluated (at least) once for each record when you use the function in a query. However, this is not needed in an approach like ray023's, since the function is called outside a query. – Brian Camire Jun 8 '11 at 11:37

Rnd is no good?

Option Compare Database
Option Explicit

Sub Test()
    Randomize
    Dim x As Integer
    'Print the first field of a 100 random records
    For x = 0 To 100
        CallRandomRecord
    Next x
End Sub

Sub CallRandomRecord()
    Dim rs As DAO.Recordset
    Dim recordCount As Long
    Dim randomRecord As Long

    Set rs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset("SELECT * FROM MyTable")
    rs.MoveLast 'To get the count
    rs.MoveFirst
    recordCount = rs.recordCount - 1
    randomRecord = CLng((recordCount) * Rnd)

     rs.Move randomRecord

     Debug.Print "Random Record No:" & randomRecord & "  Field 1:  " & rs.Fields(0)

End Sub
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1  
This is far and away the best-performing answer posted. See my answer for benchmarking results. – mwolfe02 Jun 7 '11 at 16:41

I wrote a couple functions of my own to return a random record and then timed them along with the other solutions offered here. Both of mine beat the Harkins method, but neither of them could touch @ray023's (slightly modified for benchmarking) solution. @ray023's solution is also arguably the simplest. Take that Susan Harkins!

Here's the code. You can copy it and paste into a standard module to test on your data. You just need to change the three constants at the top of the TimeThem module:

Private Declare Function GetTickCount Lib "kernel32" () As Long

Sub TimeThem()
Const Loops As Integer = 10
Const TblName As String = "Batches"
Const FldName As String = "BatchName"
Const IndexFld As String = "BatchID"
Dim i As Integer, s As Long, dummy As Variant

    s = GetTickCount
    For i = 1 To Loops
        dummy = HarkinsRandom(TblName, FldName)
    Next i
    Debug.Print "Harkins:"; GetTickCount - s

    s = GetTickCount
    For i = 1 To Loops
        dummy = RandomRecord(TblName, FldName)
    Next i
    Debug.Print "RandomRecord:"; GetTickCount - s

    s = GetTickCount
    For i = 1 To Loops
        dummy = RandomRecordWithIndex(TblName, FldName, IndexFld)
    Next i
    Debug.Print "WithIndex:"; GetTickCount - s

    s = GetTickCount
    For i = 1 To Loops
        dummy = CallRandomRecord(TblName, FldName)
    Next i
    Debug.Print "CallRandom:"; GetTickCount - s


End Sub

Function HarkinsRandom(TblName As String, FldName As String)
    Dim rs As DAO.Recordset
    Set rs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset(" SELECT TOP 1 " & FldName & _
                                     " FROM " & TblName & _
                                     " ORDER BY GetRandomValue(" & FldName & ")", _
                                     dbOpenForwardOnly)
    HarkinsRandom = rs(0)
End Function

Public Function GetRandomValue(fld As Variant)
  Randomize
  GetRandomValue = Rnd(1)
End Function

Function RandomRecord(TblName As String, FldName As String)
Dim NumRecs As Long, RecNum As Long
Dim SQL As String, SubSQL As String, rs As DAO.Recordset
Dim IndexFld As String

    Randomize
    NumRecs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset("SELECT Count(*) FROM " & TblName, dbOpenForwardOnly)(0)
    RecNum = Int(Rnd() * NumRecs + 1)
    SQL = " SELECT TOP 1 " & FldName & _
          " FROM (" & _
          "  SELECT TOP " & RecNum & " " & FldName & " " & _
          "  FROM " & TblName & _
          "  ORDER BY " & FldName & ")" & _
          " ORDER BY " & FldName & " DESC"
    Set rs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset(SQL, dbOpenForwardOnly)
    RandomRecord = rs(0)
End Function

Function RandomRecordWithIndex(TblName As String, FldName As String, _
                               Optional IndexedFieldName As String)
Dim NumRecs As Long, RecNum As Long
Dim SQL As String, SubSQL As String, rs As DAO.Recordset
Dim IndexFld As String

    Randomize
    NumRecs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset("SELECT Count(*) FROM " & TblName, dbOpenForwardOnly)(0)
    RecNum = Int(Rnd() * NumRecs + 1)
    If Len(IndexedFieldName) = 0 Or IndexedFieldName = FldName Then
        SQL = " SELECT TOP 1 " & FldName & _
              " FROM (" & _
              "  SELECT TOP " & RecNum & " " & FldName & " " & _
              "  FROM " & TblName & _
              "  ORDER BY " & FldName & ")" & _
              " ORDER BY " & FldName & " DESC"
    Else
        SQL = " SELECT TOP 1 " & FldName & _
              " FROM (" & _
              "  SELECT TOP " & RecNum & " " & FldName & ", " & IndexedFieldName & _
              "  FROM " & TblName & _
              "  ORDER BY " & IndexedFieldName & ")" & _
              " ORDER BY " & IndexedFieldName & " DESC"

    End If
    Set rs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset(SQL, dbOpenForwardOnly)
    RandomRecordWithIndex = rs(0)
End Function

Function CallRandomRecord(TblName As String, FldName As String)
    Dim rs As DAO.Recordset
    Dim recordCount As Long
    Dim RandomRecord As Long

    Set rs = CurrentDb.OpenRecordset("SELECT " & FldName & " FROM " & TblName)
    rs.MoveLast 'To get the count
    rs.MoveFirst
    recordCount = rs.recordCount - 1
    RandomRecord = CLng((recordCount) * Rnd)

     rs.Move RandomRecord

    CallRandomRecord = rs(0)
'     Debug.Print "Random Record No:" & randomRecord & "  Field 1:  " & rs.Fields(0)

End Function

And here are the results of the test running against a table with about 50,000 records (it's a locally linked Jet table; ie, it's in an .mdb on the same computer as where I ran the test):

Harkins: 4461 
RandomRecord: 2528 
WithIndex: 1918 
CallRandom: 172 

Harkins: 4150 
RandomRecord: 2278 
WithIndex: 2043 
CallRandom: 47 

CallRandom: 63 
WithIndex: 2090 
RandomRecord: 2324 
Harkins: 4197 

CallRandom: 46 
WithIndex: 1997 
RandomRecord: 2169 
Harkins: 4150 

I ran it four times reversing the order after the first two to account for potential caching advantages. As you can see, my two functions ran about twice as fast as the Harkins solution, but @ray023's solution was at its slowest more than 25 times faster (and at its fastest nearly 100 times faster).

But by all means, benchmark against your own data.

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I may be too simple to understand the problem, but it seems to me that if you want to retrieve a single random image, then all you need to do is generate a single random number that somehow keys into the table of images available to you. If there are 100 images to choose from, you want a random number from 1 to 100.

So, you generate that number:

  Round(100 * Rnd(), 0)

...and then you use that to retrieve the image. If the table of images has an Autonumber PK, you could just use that, and it would be VERY FAST. If your image is in a subform, you could set the LinkMaster to the literal PK value and that would retrieve the image for you.

On the subject of Randomize(), I can't seem to get it to repeat when I call Rnd() in the Immediate window, so I'm not sure if it's needed.

But it all seems like a very simple operation to me, one that may not require any SQL or the use of a recordset. If you go the recordset route, I'd recommend opening it once and persisting it and then navigating it each time you need it, rather than opening it repeatedly each time you need a new image. But if I were doing this, I'd make things as simple for myself as possible and go the Autonumber PK route for the images. If you wanted to do it in SQL, that would be:

  SELECT Images.ID, Images.Path
  FROM Images 
  WHERE Images.ID = Round(100 * Rnd(), 0)

Obvoiusly, you'd change 100 to an appropriate number. If you need Randomize(), then replace the direct Round(100 * Rnd(), 0) with a function that calls Randomize() and then returns Round(100 * Rnd(), 0).

But maybe I'm missing some important details that makes this much more complicated than I seem to think it is.

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What about gaps in the autonumber PK sequence due to record deletions and failed INSERTs? If Round(100 * Rnd(), 0) evaluates to 57 and there's no row with ID = 57 ... – HansUp Jun 9 '11 at 3:08
    
You'd deal with it. That is, if no records are returned, you'd get the next random number. If you're maximizing for performance, it seems to me that you'd want to insure no gaps in the PK field, though. That is, if you're going to use the data in this fashion, you'd want to make sure the data conforms to certain requirements that work as efficiently as possible. While that violates the usual principle of meaningless PKs, I have no problem with it in this case, since you're giving it a form of meaning. – David-W-Fenton Jun 12 '11 at 20:36
    
What you wrote in your comment is all true enough. My comment was in response to the last sentence in your answer. This approach is not as simple as your answer suggested. – HansUp Jun 12 '11 at 21:12
    
I dunno. If I had a bunch of images that I wanted randomized, I don't see how encoding that "business rule" in the data storage is going to be a complication beyond what would be necessary without it. That is, to me, the efficiency gained is worth the nonstandard encoding of meaning in a surrogate PK field. – David-W-Fenton Jun 15 '11 at 21:44
    
I have a stronger aversion to assigning meaning to the autonumber surrogate PK. I might do that if there were no other way, but that doesn't apply here. The method I suggested can work for a smallish record source. For a large record source, I would not use either yours or mine. Instead I would do something like @ray023 proposed. – HansUp Jun 20 '11 at 21:39

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