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I was following the instructions on making github pages, and forgot to move down into my git sub directory. As a result, I just nuked an entire directory of documents with git clean -fdx. Is there any way I can undo this terrible mistake?

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I don't know for sure, but I don't think it's possible with git. However an undelete utility for your filesystem might do the trick. –  static_rtti Jun 7 '11 at 15:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

No. Those files are gone.

(Just checked on Linux: git clean calls unlink(), and does not backup up anything beforehand.)

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I just used this command and I get here with the illusion of a solution. You cut my wings. This is the first time that a answer from StackOverflow made me feel sad instead of made me happy. –  nikoskip Jul 4 at 22:13

No. "git clean -fdx" will delete all files and directories that git does not track from your working-directory. Because Git does not track these files, it won't have any backups of these files. At least not usually.

If you have done a 'git add' on one of these files relatively recently (but aborted the commit), there is a chance you can find it with 'git fsck --lost-found'. It's worth a try, but don't get your hopes up too much.

In the future you should consider rather committing a few times too often than a few times too seldom. That way you'll at least have a local backup, even if you don't end up pushing these commits to a remote.

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The real problem was the directory was not supposed to be a repository as well. Looking back at the log, turns out I forgot to cd to the new repo directory after mkdir-ing it –  Eric Jun 7 '11 at 15:07
    
Shortly after reading this question, I wrote a patch to Git that adds a configuration variable to back-up each deleted file. Perhaps it could be useful for others? github.com/kusma/git/tree/work/clean-backup –  kusma Feb 19 '13 at 15:37
    
I was lucky today!!! Thanks to "git fsck --lost-found". I used the following to get ALL the changes: git fsck | awk '{print $3}' | xargs git show | tee searchresults.log As I wanted the entire file that I had added and then removed, I could get it from the log. :) –  Marcello de Sales Nov 9 '13 at 15:53
git clean -fdxn

Will do a dry run, and show you what files would be deleted if you ran

git clean -fdx

(of course this is only helpful if you know this ahead of time, but for next time)

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To add to this, -n works on most git commands (and many other *nix commands). –  Nicolas McCurdy Nov 9 '13 at 20:57

I had this problem today.

As others have said, git doesn't keep the files.

The only way to undo this is with an undelete utility. I used "extundelete" and recovered everything, but your mileage/filesystem may vary.

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As @kusma mentioned above, if you are lucky (if you ever did "git add"), then you can use the following to extract the entire object:

git fsck | awk '{print $3}' | xargs git show | tee searchresults.log

That way, it will look for all the types of chunks, collect the entire diffs and add to a file that you can extract the lost file. In my case, I had lost an entire Java class.

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If you are using git with MSBuild I created a target that copies all the files and then does git clean -xdf. This way you can easily restore the file if you realize that you deleted something you did not want to delete. Take a look here: http://blog.3d-logic.com/2012/11/04/safe-git-clean-with-msbuild/

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If you are working on Eclipse, one of the possible solution is to restore from local history of Eclipse.

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