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what is the best way to sort a string with numbers containing the >,<,>=,... symbols in it.

String[] v = {"<0.5",">0.5","0.5","<0.5" };


output: <0.5,<0.5,0.5,>0.5

Thanks

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2  
How about >0.5 and >0.3 and <0.4 ? –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 7 '11 at 15:07
    
As pointed out by Martijn Courteaux you can't decide how to order strings like >0.3 and >0.5, because if x > 0.3 than it can also be x > 0.5, and so you don't know if >0.3 is before or after >0.5 –  MarcoS Jun 7 '11 at 15:11
    
Depends on the requirement, if the numbers are all 1 decimal place I would take >0.3 to mean "greater than 0.3 but less than 0.35" and thus order them >0.3,<0.4,>0.5 –  djg Jun 7 '11 at 16:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
Collections.sort(List<T> list, Comparator<? super T> c) 

And then write the comparator that handles your special characters.

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Write your own Comparator doing the comparison for two elements and then use Collections.sort

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The best way is to directly use the Collections framework. For that, you need to use a dedicated Comparator (i.e. an implementation of the interface) for your special strings. have a look at the javadoc

Then you can use the Collections framework to sort a list, for instance :

Collections.sort(List<String> list, ComparatorImpl<String> c)
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To override compareTo(String) for a custom Comparator<String>, I would start by splitting the two strings to be compared in two parts with a regex such as "([=><]{0,2})(.*)". (You have two strings since one is this and the other is the argument of compareTo.) The first part of this regex gives you the qualifier (>,<=,[none],<,...) and the second part the numerical value.

First I would compare the numerical values (using Double.parseDouble): if the first compared object (this) has a smaller value than the second one, return -1 (and vice-versa). If the numerical values are identical, then you have to look at the qualifiers (<,>,...) to decide whether you send -1, +1 or 0 (identical).

EDIT: reading the comments, I realized it's not clear what ordering you are actually looking for.

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Finally! I found it. I've working on it for about 20 minutes :D

I made a Comparator, which handles the operators. Here is a test:

String[] v = {"<0.5", ">0.5", "0.5", "<0.5", "0.6", "0.2"};
Output: 0.2, <0.5, <0.5, 0.5, >0.5, 0.6

Here is the code: (remove the print statements)

package operatorcomparation;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Comparator;

/**
 *
 * @author martijn
 */
public class Main {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] v = {"<0.5", ">0.5", "0.5", "<0.5"};
        Arrays.sort(v, new OperatorComparator());
        System.out.println(Arrays.asList(v));
    }

    public static class OperatorComparator implements Comparator<String> {

        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            System.out.printf("\ns1= %s, s2= %s\n", o1, o2);
            double value1 = Double.parseDouble(o1.replaceAll("[<>=]*([0-9\\.]+)$", "$1"));
            double value2 = Double.parseDouble(o2.replaceAll("[<>=]*([0-9\\.]+)$", "$1"));
            System.out.printf("v1=%f, v2=%f\n", value1, value2);
            double comparation = value1 - value2;
            if (Math.abs(comparation) <= 0.00001d) {
                boolean o1p = !o1.matches("[0-9\\.]+");
                boolean o2p = !o2.matches("[0-9\\.]+");
                String operator1 = null;
                String operator2 = null;
                if (o1p) {
                    operator1 = o1.replaceFirst("([<>=]*)([0-9\\.]+)", "$1");
                }
                if (o2p) {
                    operator2 = o2.replaceFirst("([<>=]*)([0-9\\.]+)", "$1");
                }
                System.out.println("o1: " + operator1 + ", o2: " + operator2);
                if (!o1p && !o2p) {
                    return 0;
                }
                if (o1p && o2p) {
                    if (operator1.equals(operator2)) {
                        return 0;
                    }
                    if (operator1.startsWith("<") && operator2.startsWith("<")) {
                        if (operator1.length() == 2) {
                            return -1;
                        } else {
                            return 1;
                        }
                    }
                    if (operator1.startsWith(">") && operator2.startsWith(">")) {
                        if (operator1.length() == 2) {
                            return 1;
                        } else {
                            return -1;
                        }
                    }
                    if (operator1.startsWith(">") && operator2.startsWith("<"))
                    {
                        return 1;
                    } else
                    {
                        return -1;
                    }
                }
                if (!o1p) {
                    if (operator2.startsWith("<")) {
                        return 1;
                    }
                    if (operator2.startsWith(">")) {
                        return -1;
                    }
                    throw new RuntimeException("This is impossible!");
                }
                if (!o2p) {
                    if (operator1.startsWith("<")) {
                        return -1;
                    }
                    if (operator1.startsWith(">")) {
                        return 1;
                    }
                    throw new RuntimeException("This is impossible!");
                }


            }
//            System.out.println(comparation);
            if (comparation < 0.0d) {
                return -1;
            } else {
                return 1;
            }

        }
    }
}
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