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I want to invent a new mime-type and associate it to a custom application in the browser to enable users to launch my app from a web page. The users of my secure web site are in a closed-environment, meaning this is not a general-purpose, mainstream application - I can configure their browser ahead of time.

Spoon.net does something very similar to enable launching virtualized applications using their mini-kernel plugin.

One of the answers to this question alluded to this method, without details for how to accomplish it.

How do I achieve this in a cross-platform manner on Chrome and IE 8/9? Is there a way to do the mime-type association through browser extensions, either native or through crossrider? How does an app like Adobe Reader or Apple Quicktime achieve this? I want to avoid touching the registry if possible.

What are the risks associated with this method? My site is an intranet web application secured with a certificate and trusted by my users. Any reason I should not go down this path?

EDIT: Apparently this can be achieved in Firefox by manipulating the mimeTypes.rdf file.

EDIT: It looks like JDIC is a Java-based mechanism that could be used for the same thing. Is there a similar non-Java construct? Maybe in Javascript?

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I don't know much about this, but I've seen some apps use a custom url scheme, like callto: for skype That may be a simpler option? –  grapefrukt Jun 7 '11 at 15:31
    
Yeah, based on the question I linked it sounds like that is a custom protocol, requiring an associated app to be running when that url is followed. I was hoping to avoid that, instead let the browser / extension recognize a MIME-type and fire up the app. I'm trying to minimize client-side installation and resource usage if possible. Good suggestion, though! –  retrodrone Jun 7 '11 at 15:39
    
Information about registering protocols can be found here. This may be the route I go, but I'd really like to know how to do it with a custom mime-type. –  retrodrone Jun 7 '11 at 16:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+50

It looks like it can be done via a registry change on windows.

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.atom]
    @="atom_file"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\atom_file]
    @="Atom Syndication Program"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\atom_file\shell]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\atom_file\shell\open]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\atom_file\shell\open\command]
    @="\"C:\\AtomHandler\\handle.exe\" %1"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\MIME\Database\Content Type\application/atom+xml]
    "Extension"=".atom"

Further reading on Windows...

And here's how to do so on Linux.

Use xdg-utils from freedesktop.org Portland

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