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I have been reading the R Language Definition file. Recently I came across this syntax as a shortcut for subset assignment. For example

> x <- c(1:16)
> x[3:5] <- 13:15
> x
[1]  1  2 13 14 15  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

instead of

> x <- c(1:16)
> x[3:5] <- x[13:15]
> x

This can be made much more elaborate as in

> x[3:5] <- 13:15 + 15
> x
[1]  1  2 28 29 30  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
> x[3:5] <- 13:15*15:15
> x
[1]   1   2 195 210 225   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16

To me this seems like a neat trick. On the other hand it seems like using it will inevitably lead to unreadable code.

Does anyone know of a good reason to use this kind of feature?

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closed as not a real question by Joris Meys, Gavin Simpson, Sacha Epskamp, Dirk Eddelbuettel, JD Long Jun 7 '11 at 16:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
You have to implement values in parts of an object all the time. This is like asking if it is a good idea to use a pen to write things down:) –  Sacha Epskamp Jun 7 '11 at 15:42
    
Maybe I need to edit my title. I am asking about the specific syntax outlined in my post. Let me know if there is a better name for this. –  kalu Jun 7 '11 at 16:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Subset assignment is invaluable when you only want to replace some of the elements of an object in R.

Consider this example when programming. We have an S3 generic and a method. We might like to print the call in the output

foo <- function(x, ...) {
    UseMethod("foo")
}

foo.default <- function(x, na.rm = TRUE) {
    obj <- list(fitted.values = mean(x, na.rm = na.rm),
                call = match.call())
    class(obj) <- "foo"
    obj
}

print.foo <- function(x, ...) {
    writeLines(strwrap("Call:"))
    print(x$call)
    cat("\n")
    print(fitted(x), ...)
}

Look what happens when we use this though:

R> set.seed(2)
R> foo(runif(10))
Call:
foo.default(x = runif(10))

[1] 0.5496559

It would be nicer if the call was just foo(x = runif(10)). We can rewrite our default method to resent the matched call using subset assignment:

foo.default <- function(x, na.rm = TRUE) {
    obj <- list(fitted.values = mean(x, na.rm = na.rm),
                call = match.call())
    obj$call[[1]] <- as.name("foo") ## here is the edit
    class(obj) <- "foo"
    obj
}

Which gives the much nicer:

R> set.seed(2)
R> foo(runif(10))
Call:
foo(x = runif(10))

[1] 0.5496559

The point is, that I don't need to know how to generate the appropriate matched call in it's entirety, I can just update one aspect of the call using subset assignment. This is a real boon when you just need to alter one or a few components of an object and not just a trick.

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I am new to R and I definitely learned some stuff from reading your code. Your answer is not quite getting at my question though. Please see my comment above. –  kalu Jun 7 '11 at 16:38
    
@kalu well I used the same syntax (I need [[ instead of [ because the call is a list but that is a minor usage issue) as you. I don't think it leads to unreadable code and I don't think it is a tweak. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 7 '11 at 16:56
    
I realized I was not interpreting the example correctly. For some reason the way I was reading the example I though x<-2*1:4; x[1:2]<-3:4 would set x[2] equal to 8. Clearly that makes no sense. –  kalu Jun 7 '11 at 18:27

If you are objecting to overwriting the original object then try the following which returns a new object and leaves x unchanged:

xnew <- replace(x, 3:5, 13:15*15:15)
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. What is the difference between replace() and "[<-"? For example x.tst <- array(1:6, c(2,3)); s.tst <- array(0, c(2,3)); s.tst[1:3] <- 1; "[<-"(x.tst, s.tst==1, 0)? –  kalu Jun 14 '11 at 15:23
    
@kalu, Assuming you meant "[<-"(x.tst, c(s.tst==1), 0) that statement overwrites x.tst with a new value whereas replace(x.tst, c(s.tst==1), 0) returns the value instead. –  G. Grothendieck Jun 14 '11 at 16:30
    
Actually, that is not the case. See my other post link –  kalu Jun 14 '11 at 16:38
    
@kalu, Good point. They are identical: x.tst.1 <- x.tst.2 <- x.tst; identical("[<-"(x.tst.1, c(s.tst)==1, 0), replace(x.tst.2, c(s.tst)==1, 0)) gives TRUE and identical(x.tst.1, x.tst) and identical(x.tst.2, x.tst) are each TRUE as well. –  G. Grothendieck Jun 14 '11 at 18:29
    
@kalu, Good point. They are identical: x.tst.1 <- x.tst.2 <- x.tst; identical("[<-"(x.tst.1, c(s.tst)==1, 0), replace(x.tst.2, c(s.tst)==1, 0)) gives TRUE and identical(x.tst.1, x.tst) and identical(x.tst.2, x.tst) are each TRUE as well. At any rate the key point relative to your post is that regardless of whether you use replace or [<-(...) they don't have side effects which is the dangerous aspect of what you were referring to in the question. –  G. Grothendieck Jun 14 '11 at 18:40

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