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<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function () {

        $('[type=button]').click(function () {
            var modelcount = $('#modelcount').val();
            modelcount++;
            if (modelcount >= 10) {
                $("#prodform").prepend('<div class="validation-summary-errors"><ul><li>Only 10 serial numbers can be added</li></ul></div>');
                $('[type=button]').attr("disabled", "disabled");
                $('[type=button]').removeClass().addClass('disabled');
            }
            else { //THIS BIT HERE!!!!!
                $(".entry").last().after().append('<div class="entry"><label for="HandHeldProducts_' + modelcount + '__SerialNumber">Serial Number</label><input' + ($.MyFunction($("#BothProducts"))) ? 'disabled = "disabled"' : '' + ' class="serial" id="HandHeldProducts_' + modelcount + '__SerialNumber" name="HandHeldProducts[' + modelcount + '].SerialNumber" placeholder="Serial Number" type="text" value="" /></div>')
                $('#modelcount').val(modelcount);
            }
        });

        $.MyFunction = function (elemnt) {
            return (elemnt.attr("checked") != "undefined" && elemnt.attr("checked") == "checked");
        };

    });
</script>
share|improve this question
5  
I think you have bigger issues, given the length of that line! :-) –  Platinum Azure Jun 7 '11 at 16:02
    
Recommend a better approach then –  Jon Jun 7 '11 at 16:03
2  
Try wrapping the whole thing in () just to be explicit –  theabraham Jun 7 '11 at 16:04
2  
Have you tried surrounding the whole of the ternary operator in parenthesis? Otherwise it might be interpreting some of the internals as strings to concatenate. Try: '<div class="entry"><label for="HandHeldProducts_' + modelcount + '__SerialNumber">Serial Number</label><input' + ($.MyFunction($("#BothProducts")) ? 'disabled = "disabled"' : '') + ' class="serial" id="HandHeldProducts_' + modelcount + '__SerialNumber" name="HandHeldProducts[' + modelcount + '].SerialNumber" placeholder="Serial Number" type="text" value="" /></div>'. Note the moved close paren to after ''. –  justkt Jun 7 '11 at 16:06
1  
Define 'doesn't work'? Do you get an error? The 2nd result in that ternary operator is probably much more of that line then you intended. –  Ryan Olds Jun 7 '11 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you are doing :

$(".entry").last().after().append(
    '<div class="entry"><label for="HandHeldProducts_' + 
    modelcount + 
    '__SerialNumber">Serial Number</label><input' +
    ($.MyFunction($("#BothProducts"))) ? 
        'disabled = "disabled"' : 
        '' + ' class="serial" id="HandHeldProducts_' + 
            modelcount + 
            '__SerialNumber" name="HandHeldProducts[' + 
            modelcount + 
            '].SerialNumber" placeholder="Serial Number" type="text" value="" /></div>'
)

Basically above the rest of your string concatenation is in the "else" block of the ternary

To avoid this wrap your tenary in brackets.

What you want to do :

$(".entry").last().after().append(
    '<div class="entry"><label for="HandHeldProducts_' + 
    modelcount + 
    '__SerialNumber">Serial Number</label><input' +
    (($.MyFunction($("#BothProducts"))) ? 
        'disabled = "disabled"' : 
        '') + 
    ' class="serial" id="HandHeldProducts_' + 
    modelcount + 
    '__SerialNumber" name="HandHeldProducts[' + 
    modelcount + 
    '].SerialNumber" placeholder="Serial Number" type="text" value="" /></div>'
)

The real problem

String concatenation like this is a *****. Use the DOM or use templates.

Below is DOM: (un-tested)

$(".entry").last().after().append(
    $("<div></div>", {
        "class": "entry"    
    }).append(
        $("<label></label>", {
            "label": "HandHeldProducts_" + modelcount + "__SerialNumber"
            "text": "Serial Number"
        })  
    ).append(
        $("<input/>", {
            "class": "serial",
            "id": "HandHeldProducts_" + modelcount + "__SerialNumber"
            "name": "HandHenldProducts[" + modelcount + "].SerialNumber",
            "placeholder": "Serial Number",
            "type": "text",
            "value": ""
        })
    )
);

if ($.MyFunction($("#BothProducts")) {
    $("#HandHeldProducts_" + modelcount + "__SerialNumber").attr("disabled", "disabled");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks however its not adding the disabled bit to it. Is my function correct to determine if a radiobutton is checked –  Jon Jun 7 '11 at 16:13
    
DOM insertion is a way better approach than html strings... this is your solution right here :) –  Chris Baker Jun 7 '11 at 16:20

Try to break up the string into bits to make it easier to understand:

var html = '<div class="entry">';
html += '<label for="HandHeldProducts_'+modelcount+'__SerialNumber">Serial Number</label>';
html +=  '<input'+($.MyFunction($("#BothProducts")) ? 'disabled = "disabled"' : '');
html += ' class="serial" id="HandHeldProducts_' + modelcount;
html += '__SerialNumber" name="HandHeldProducts[' + modelcount + '].SerialNumber"';
html +=' placeholder="Serial Number" type="text" value="" />';
html += '</div>';
$(".entry").last().after().append(html);
$('#modelcount').val(modelcount);

I didn't see anything wrong while I broke the string up, but there might have been a spare parenthesis in there. All in all, I think the only problem here was the excessive line length - that kind of code is hard to keep clean, and hard to debug.

share|improve this answer
    
Better but that just dilutes the problem. –  Raynos Jun 7 '11 at 16:17
    
I agree with your second approach, via DOM insertion. However, I am not a jQuery guy, so I didn't even try to include that here - I thought you had done a good job of that in your edit. In my own code, I would never insert a string of HTML into a DOM node, but I think the entire mootools library is built in such a way so as discourage that, whereas jquery kind of encourages it. –  Chris Baker Jun 7 '11 at 16:19
    
I wouldn't say jQuery encourages it. jQuery is more popular and has a far wider collection of inexperienced developers. You'll probably find that MooTools has a better developer on average. –  Raynos Jun 7 '11 at 16:23
    
I say they encourage in the sense that it dangles the possibility in the very syntax. A new element object in jQuery: $("<div></div>"); - that's just one step below putting the contents of the div right in that same string, jQuery doesn't mind and it even seems intuitive to do so; you'd have to know that it is bad practice to avoid it. Mootools object init: var t = new Element('div'); will not accept contents within the constructor argument, so you aren't even tempted to use string content. I prefer the latter syntax, it really is a big part of my preference for Mootools over jQuery :) –  Chris Baker Jun 7 '11 at 17:29
    
I can imagine. I'm pedantic though with $("<div></div>"), $("<div>") is fine and more commonly used. –  Raynos Jun 7 '11 at 17:31

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