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What is the best regular expression for validating email addresses?

I am using the following regular expression to validate e-mail addresses:

^[a-zA-Z][\w\.-]*[a-zA-Z0-9]@[a-zA-Z0-9][\w\.-]*[a-zA-Z0-9]\.[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z\.]*[a-zA-Z]$

It doesn't consider the following e-mail address valid: username@q.com, but according to our customer it is a valid e-mail.

How do I modify the following regular expression statement to accept username@q.com as a valid e-mail address?

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marked as duplicate by Marc B, orangepips, Tom Anderson, C. A. McCann, Dori Jun 9 '11 at 3:50

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The regex pattern you posted was specifically designed to catch common errors at the cost for disallowing some valid email addresses. It surely allows some invalid email addresses at too. –  ikegami Jun 7 '11 at 17:45
    
Comments about using regex to solve this notwithstanding, this specific section @[a-zA-Z0-9][\w\.-]*[a-zA-Z0-9]\. is what is not matching in this case because it is looking for at least 2 characters between "@" and "." There is a good short reference at regular-expressions.info and a number of sandbox tools listed in stackoverflow.com/questions/463796/… –  cordsen Jun 7 '11 at 18:27

1 Answer 1

Why do you need a regular expression to check the validity of an e-mailadres? If I would fill in fake@fake.com the regular expression would also say it is valid.

In my opinion, regular expressions take a lot of runtime to evaluate, and mostly do not make you accomplish your goal. Think about why you actually need it, and perhaps go for a simpler one that just checks if it is of the form #@#.# (#=some text) See: http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9585

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