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Sorry if this has been asked, but I cannot find similar answer in a hurry search. I want all pairwise comparisons for all rows in the matrix, obviously double for loop will work but extremely expensive for large dataset. I looked up implicit loop like apply() etc but havenot a clue how to avoid the inner loop. Any suggestions? Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm assuming you're trying do some type of comparison across all row-pairs of a matrix. You could use outer() to run through all pairs of row-indices, and apply a vectorized comparison function to each row-pair. E.g. you could calculate the squared Euclidean distance among all row-pairs as follows:

m <- matrix(1:12,4,3)     
> outer(1:4,1:4, FUN = Vectorize( function(i,j) sum((m[i,]-m[j,])^2 )) )
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    0    3   12   27
[2,]    3    0    3   12
[3,]   12    3    0    3
[4,]   27   12    3    0
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Great answer! Thanks. Only thing I have not understood is that 1:4, 1:4, in the outer function used in the example? Are they the dimensions of the output but I thought they should be the arguments for FUN? –  rpylearning Jun 7 '11 at 18:35
    
4 is the number of rows in the original matrix. –  Aaron Jun 7 '11 at 18:41
    
I have a following up question for using data from the result matrix, here is the correlation matrix, e.g. –  rpylearning Jun 7 '11 at 21:53
    
@rpylearning -- your comment was incomplete... –  Prasad Chalasani Jun 7 '11 at 22:08
    
sorry, my question is that I need to retrieve all elements from each row not in the range of (mean-4sd, mean+4sd) from that row, such as 0.9 will be outlier with a mean of 0.6 and sd 0.02. I wonder is there a elegant way for doing this? Thanks! –  rpylearning Jun 7 '11 at 22:54

outer() works fine if you are willing to do self-compare - such as 1-1 and 2-2 etc... (the diagonal values in the matrix). Also outer() performs both 1-2 and 2-1 comparisions.

Most of the times pair-wise comparisions only require triangular comparisions, without the self-comparision and mirror comparisions. To achieve triangular comparisions, use combn() method.

Here is a sample output to show the difference between outer() and combn()

> v <- c(1,2,3,4)
> outer(v, v, function(x, y) print(paste(x, "-", y)))
 [1] "1 - 1" "2 - 1" "3 - 1" "4 - 1" "1 - 2" "2 - 2" "3 - 2" "4 - 2" "1 - 3" "2 - 3" "3 - 3" "4 - 3" "1 - 4" "2 - 4" "3 - 4" "4 - 4"

Note the "1-1" self-comparisions above. And the "1-2" and "2-1" mirror comparisions. Contrast it with the below:

> v <- c(1,2,3,4)
> allPairs <- combn(length(v), 2) # choose a pair from 1:length(v)
> a_ply(combn(length(v), 2), 2, function(x) print(paste(x[1],"--",x[2]))) # iterate over all pairs
[1] "1 -- 2"
[1] "1 -- 3"
[1] "1 -- 4"
[1] "2 -- 3"
[1] "2 -- 4"
[1] "3 -- 4" 

You can see the "upper triangular" part of the matrix in the above.

Outer() is more apt when you have two different vectors to do pair-wise operation. For performing pair-wise operations within a single vector, more often than not you can get away with combn.

For example, if you are doing outer(x,x,...) then you are perhaps doing it wrong - you should consider combn(length(x),2))

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I tried applying this approach to get cross correlation matrix for a list of time series where I want to calculate CCF matrix. ccff <- function(x){ ccf(x[1], x[2], lag.max = 12, plot = FALSE) }. where x is a list of time series. Would you please suggest how to use this. adply(combn(tslist, 2), 2, function(x)ccff(x)) is not working. Thanks. –  Anusha 17 hours ago
    
@Anusha Please share your sample code (that populates X and runs the ccff) - will check it. You can IM me your snippet using my contact form at gk.palem.in/Contact.html –  Gopalakrishna Palem 11 hours ago
    
Please see this question in which I was trying to use mapply. I am curious to know how adply can be used for calc on set of pair of series. stackoverflow.com/questions/25477116/…. Thanks. –  Anusha 8 hours ago
    
aaply can be used for this purpose. I have given sample working code and notes as an answer to your indicated question, here: stackoverflow.com/a/26162253/451456 Thank you. –  Gopalakrishna Palem 10 mins ago

Maybe not so universal solution as @Prasad but much faster in this special case of sum of squares:

dist(m)^2
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@Gopalkrishna Palem

I like your solution! However, I think you should use combn(v, 2) instead of combn(length(v), 2). combn(length(v), 2) only iterates over the indecies of v

> v <- c(3,4,6,7)
> combn(v, 2)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    3    3    3    4    4    6
[2,]    4    6    7    6    7    7

> combn(length(v), 2)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    1    1    2    2    3
[2,]    2    3    4    3    4    4

> a_ply(combn(v, 2), 2, function(x) print(paste(x[1],"--",x[2])) )
[1] "3 -- 4"
[1] "3 -- 6"
[1] "3 -- 7"
[1] "4 -- 6"
[1] "4 -- 7"
[1] "6 -- 7"
> a_ply(combn(length(v), 2), 2, function(x) print(paste(x[1],"--",x[2])) )
[1] "1 -- 2"
[1] "1 -- 3"
[1] "1 -- 4"
[1] "2 -- 3"
[1] "2 -- 4"
[1] "3 -- 4"

so the final result is correct with combn(v, 2).

Then if we have a dataframe, we can use the indices to apply a function to pairwise rows:

> df
  x  y
1 4  8
2 5  9
3 6 10
4 7 11

a_ply(combn(nrow(df), 2), 2, function(x) print(df[x[1],] - df[x[2],]))
   x  y
1 -1 -1
   x  y
1 -2 -2
   x  y
1 -3 -3
   x  y
2 -1 -1
   x  y
2 -2 -2
   x  y
3 -1 -1

However, a_ply will discard the result, so how can I store the output in a vector for further analysis? I don't want to just print the result

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To store the output, you can try aaply or adply instead of a_ply –  Gopalakrishna Palem Sep 28 at 4:20

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