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Current Code

Hi I have a function like this:

jj::[Int]->[Int]
jj xs = [x|x<-xs,x `mod` 2 ==0]

For the input [1..20] it gives me as output :

[2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18,20] -> only the values divisible by 2 

What I require

If list value is dividable by 2, it is interpreted as 0 and otherwise as 1:

Input : [243,232,243]

Output : [1,0,1]

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1  
You should read about the fmap function. – Alexandre C. Jun 7 '11 at 18:14
1  
Is this homework? By the way, 244 is divisible by 2... – alternative Jun 7 '11 at 18:19
    
this is nt home work .. even this is nt what i required .. justt posted this quiz to get a simple idea how to build – Sudantha Jun 7 '11 at 18:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Surely you just want map:

jj::[Int]->[Int]
jj xs = map (`mod` 2) xs

Due to currying

map (`mod` 2) :: [Int] -> [Int]

is exactly the function we want, so we can just do:

jj::[Int]->[Int]
jj = map (`mod` 2)

Both yield:

*Main> jj [2,4,5,6,8,9]
[0,0,1,0,0,1]
share|improve this answer
    
simple and clear ! – Sudantha Jun 7 '11 at 18:29
    
One could also write map (.&. 1) which would be more efficient in some cases. – FUZxxl Jun 7 '11 at 18:47

If you want the [] syntax (aka. the list comprehension), you can say

jj::[Int]->[Int]
jj xs = [x `mod` 2 | x<-xs]

which is equivalent to MGwynne's map solution.

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1  
Too bad list comprehensions aren't point-free. – alternative Jun 7 '11 at 18:44
2  
If one knows enough about Haskell to care about point-free solutions, I'm sure translating between the two styles of solution shoudln't be too much effort! – yatima2975 Jun 7 '11 at 19:05

Look at the following functions:

map :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
fmap :: (Functor f) => (a -> b) -> f a -> f b

where a list is an instance of the typeclass functor. You'll need a function of type Int -> Int that does your transformation.

jj :: (Functor f, Integral i) => f i -> f i
jj = fmap (`mod` 2)

(For lists, both map and fmap do the same thing. fmap is a generalization of map)

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+1 for an informative answer! It's nice to get the poster to think about such generalisations (the bread and butter of Haskell!). – MGwynne Jun 7 '11 at 18:34
1  
jj :: (Functor f, Integral i) => f i -> f i works too, since you're using fmap. – Alex Jun 7 '11 at 19:17
    
@Alex good point. – alternative Jun 7 '11 at 20:16

The recursive way:

dividablelist :: [Int] -> [Int]
dividablelist [] = []
dividablelist (x:xs) = mod x 2 : dividablelist xs
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