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I have a simple code:

var http = require("http");

var server = http.createServer(function(request, response) {
    response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type" : "text/html"});
    response.write("Hello World");
    response.end();
});

server.listen(8000);

console.log("Server has started.");

I would like to put this code into server.js. This code has to be a MODULE that has many internal functions. I would like to create server module and listen() function inside it.

I should put createServer() inside a function called listen().

If I have index.js how can I call this module and then do something like server.listen()?

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1  
Question is a bit of a mess. What are you actually asking? –  Raynos Jun 7 '11 at 18:32

3 Answers 3

The common pattern for nodejs modules is to create a file (e.g. mymodule.js) so:

var myFunc = function() {
   ...
};

exports.myFunc = myFunc;

If you store this in the directory node_modules it can be imported thus:

var mymodule = require('mymodule');

mymodule.myFunc(args...);

So, in your case, your module server.js could look like this:

// server.js
var http = require("http");

var listen = function(port) {
    var server = http.createServer(function(request, response) {
        response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type" : "text/html"});
        response.write("Hello World");
        response.end();
    });
    server.listen(port);
};

exports.listen = listen;

which would be invoked:

// client.js
var server = require('server');
server.listen(8000);
share|improve this answer
    
so in my server.js i can't call "server" variabile....because it's local (inside listen function.....right? –  dail Jun 7 '11 at 19:41
    
@dail That's right, I'm afraid. If you made its declaration module-wide by putting it outside the function you could only create one server. Your utility functions could be inner functions within listen, though, where they'd still have access to that variable. –  Alnitak Jun 7 '11 at 20:00
1  
Is it possible to import a module that is stored in a specific location on the disk (i. e., /home/username/Desktop), instead of in the node_modules folder? –  Anderson Green Nov 23 '12 at 3:08

Old post, but if someone is still interested in I would suggest following solution:

//server.js

var http = require("http");

// As soon as method will be used outside the module, use "this":

this.listen = function(port) {
    var server = http.createServer(function(request, response) {
        response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type": "text/html"});
        response.write("Hello World");
        response.end();
    });
    server.listen(port);
};


//index.js

var module = require('./server');
module.listen(8000);
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// main.js
var server = require("server");

server.listen(8000);

console.log("Server has started.");


// server.js

var http = require("http");

var server = http.createServer(function(request, response) {
    response.writeHead(200, {
        "Content-Type": "text/html"
    });
    response.write("Hello World");
    response.end();
});

module.exports = server;
share|improve this answer
4  
FWIW, I wouldn't expect merely "requiring" a module to actually have side effects (such as instanting a server) in the way this code does. –  Alnitak Jun 7 '11 at 18:38
    
@Alnitak I guess it is bad design. It's not actually listening on the server though. It's an acceptable grey area for this specifically but generally it is bad –  Raynos Jun 7 '11 at 18:48

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