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I want to do something like this in Java but I don't know the way:

When event "object 1 say 'hello'" happens, then object 2 responds to that event by saying "hello".

Can somebody give me a hint or sample code?

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3 Answers

up vote 77 down vote accepted

You probably want to look into the observer pattern.

Here's some sample code to get you started:

import java.util.*;

interface HelloListener {
    public void someoneSaidHello();
}


class Initiater {
    List<HelloListener> listeners = new ArrayList<HelloListener>();

    public void addListener(HelloListener toAdd) {
        listeners.add(toAdd);
    }

    public void sayHello() {
        System.out.println("Hello!!");

        // Notify everybody that may be interested.
        for (HelloListener hl : listeners)
            hl.someoneSaidHello();
    }
}


class Responder implements HelloListener {
    @Override
    public void someoneSaidHello() {
        System.out.println("Hello there...");
    }
}

 

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Initiater initiater = new Initiater();
        Responder responder = new Responder();

        initiater.addListener(responder);

        initiater.sayHello();
    }
}
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Thanks a lot, This seems the solution I need. –  conmadoi Jun 7 '11 at 19:02
    
No problem. You're welcome. –  aioobe Jun 7 '11 at 19:03
    
Is there a legitimate reason stackoverflow.com/suggested-edits/237242 did not go through? It shows how to do this with 2 classes as the question originally asked. –  GlassGhost May 4 '12 at 21:34
    
What if multiple threads are generating the source events, will this be synchronized properly ? –  Mike G Nov 5 '12 at 5:18
1  
@GlassGhost: It was rejected because it was basically a total rewrite. Edits to someone else's answer are good if they fix typos and formatting and broken links and such, but they shouldn't radically change the content. (Some exceptions apply for posts marked "community wiki".) –  cHao Jan 23 at 20:18
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What you want is an implementation of the observer pattern. You can do it yourself completely, or use java classes like java.util.Observer and java.util.Observable

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Thanks for your hint –  conmadoi Jun 7 '11 at 19:01
    
Reuse - Recycle. But take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/2380676/… –  count0 May 25 '12 at 20:11
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Here's how to do it with 2 classes as the question originally asked:

5 Things needed on throwing side:

  • import of java.util.event
  • a declaration of the events that can caught by a catcher
  • a list of catchers
  • a way to add someone to the list of catchers
  • 1 or more times, a Notification that an event happened is thrown.

throwing side code:

//import of java.util.event
import java.util.*;

//a declaration of the events that can caught by a catcher
interface ThrowListener {
    public void Catch();
}

class Thrower {
    //a list of catchers
    List<ThrowListener> listeners = new ArrayList<ThrowListener>();
    //a way to add someone to the list of catchers
    public void addThrowListener(ThrowListener toAdd){
        listeners.add(toAdd);
    }

    public void Throw() {
        System.out.println("Something thrown");

        //1 or more times, a Notification that an event happened is thrown.
        for (ThrowListener hl : listeners) hl.Catch();
    }
}

3 Things needed on catching side:

  • implement added to class
  • instantiation of a thrower object and use of it's addListener function
  • an override of 1 events that can caught by this type of catcher

Catching side code:

class Catcher1 implements ThrowListener {//implement added to class
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //instantiation of a thrower object and use of it's addListener function
        Thrower ThrowerInstance = new Thrower();
        ThrowerInstance.addThrowListener(this);

        ThrowerInstance.Throw();
    }
    //an override of 1 events that can caught by this type of catcher
    @Override public void Catch() {
        System.out.println("I caught something!!");
    }
}
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This explains more division for both classes. That's the way, ah-ah ah-ah, I like it. –  Raccoon29 Oct 3 '13 at 14:14
    
Really wish and admin would mark this as the accepted answer, it is clearly more comprehensive, simple, and terse. Also I could use the upvotes, I might know of a few questions that could use bounties ;) –  GlassGhost Oct 3 '13 at 20:08
    
One cannot use 'this' literal within main since main is static. –  Jafar Ali Dec 6 '13 at 5:11
    
@JafarAli Even though it compiles for me, what would you suggest? –  GlassGhost Dec 6 '13 at 18:50
    
@GlassGhost. It gave me compile time error with java JDK 1.6 while trying. "Cannot use this in a static context". –  Jafar Ali Dec 9 '13 at 12:12
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