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This is just a test script. I'm testing basic child fork functionality before making a simple lib to let me spawn out multiple processes to process data batches in parallel in php. Anything else I should test to understand before proceeding? I understand that all resources are copied during a fork, so initialize/open any resources needed after the fork.

<?php

$childcount = 10;

for($i = 1; $i <= $childcount; $i ++)
{
    $pid = pcntl_fork();
    if ($pid == -1) {
         echo "failed to fork on loop $i of forking\n";
    } else if ($pid) {
         // we are the parent
$pidArray[$pid] = $pid;
         // and we want to wait on all children at the end of the loop
    } else {
         // we are the child
        echo "Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: $i \n ";
        doMessage($i);
        die;
    }
}

echo "sleeping to see if child finished events queue\n";
sleep(10);

print_r($pidArray);

for($j = 1; $j <= $childcount; $j++)
{
    echo "parent is waiting on child\n";
    $pid = pcntl_wait($status); //Wait for random child to finish
    $pidArray[$pid] = "terminated";
    echo "parent found $j of the finished children\n";
}

print_r($pidArray);

function doMessage($location)
{
    sleep (rand(4,20));
    echo "outputting concurrently : $location \n"; 
}

Output looks like this:

me@myhost:~/$]: php test.php
sleeping to see if child finished events queue
Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 3 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 4 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 5 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 6 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 8 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 9 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 10 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 7 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 2 
 Child is outputting it's count and dying. Count: 1 
 outputting concurrently : 9 
outputting concurrently : 1 
outputting concurrently : 6 
Array
(
    [22700] => 22700
    [22701] => 22701
    [22702] => 22702
    [22703] => 22703
    [22704] => 22704
    [22705] => 22705
    [22706] => 22706
    [22707] => 22707
    [22708] => 22708
    [22709] => 22709
)
parent is waiting on child
parent found 1 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
parent found 2 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
parent found 3 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
outputting concurrently : 5 
parent found 4 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
outputting concurrently : 2 
parent found 5 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
outputting concurrently : 3 
parent found 6 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
outputting concurrently : 8 
parent found 7 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
outputting concurrently : 7 
parent found 8 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
outputting concurrently : 4 
outputting concurrently : 10 
parent found 9 of the finished children
parent is waiting on child
parent found 10 of the finished children
Array
(
    [22700] => terminated
    [22701] => terminated
    [22702] => terminated
    [22703] => terminated
    [22704] => terminated
    [22705] => terminated
    [22706] => terminated
    [22707] => terminated
    [22708] => terminated
    [22709] => terminated
)

I've also confirmed that an additional pctl_wait will just return immediately with the pid of -1 .

share|improve this question
    
doing this in php isn't the best way. You can just let run multiple php script without the needing of forking –  dynamic Jun 7 '11 at 20:11
1  
Looks ok on quick readthrough. –  Marc B Jun 7 '11 at 20:11

1 Answer 1

Your example does not touch the issues you can encouter with pcntl_fork.

Remember that fork() makes a copy of the program, which means all descriptors are copied. Unfortunately, this is a rather bad situation for a PHP program because most descriptors are handled by PHP or a PHP Extension internally.

The simple, and probably "proper" way to solve this issue is to fork before hand, there really should be no need to fork at many different points among a program, you would simply fork, and then delegate the work. Use a master/worker hierarchy.

For example, if you need to have many processes that use a MySQL Connection, just fork before the connection is made, that way each child has it´s own connection to mysql that it, and it alone, manages.

Another thing to watch out for, is when a child process dies. It's death should be handled by the parent. If it isn't, the child becomes a zombie: it doesn't consume resources, but it still is a process with a PID and all that. This is undesirable, since most (all?) operating systems have an upper limit on the processes it can handle.

When a child dies, a signal is sent to the parent (SIGCHLD). The parent can then handle the death of the child for internal processing. The correct way to unzombie a child is using pcntl_waitpid(). You can use that function to wait until the child dies, or to detect that a child has already died. Use pcntl_wait() when you want to do this for a myriad of children. Look at the relevant section of the PHP manual for more options (including letting the function know not to suspend normal operation).

Using SIGCHLD, however, is not always foolproof. When you quickly create many shortlived children, handling SIGCHLD in combination with pcntl_waitpid() might not handle all zombie processes.

Hope this helped, the documentation is ok on php.net but in my opinion the could have gone deeper in the subjects and potential pitfalls as these functions are easy to misuse.

Here is a trivial example (ripped from php.net comment) that shows bad allocation of ressources to parent thread:

<?php 
mysql_connect(/* enter a working server here maybe? */); 
$f=pcntl_fork();

while(true){    
    sleep(rand(0,10)/100); 
    $r=mysql_query("select $f;"); 

    if(!$r)die($f.": ".mysql_error()."\n"); 
      list($x)=mysql_fetch_array($r); 
      echo ($f)?".":"-"; 
    if($x!=$f) echo ($f.": fail: $x!=$f\n "); 
} 
?>

Running this on cli will ouptut different results:

  • very often is just hangs and doesn't output anything anymore

  • also very often, the server closes the connection, probably because it receives interleaved requests it can't process.

  • sometimes one process gets the result of the OTHER processes' query! (because both send their queries down the same socket, and it's pure luck who gets the reply)

Hope this helps when you expand on your example to fetch the data and / or use ressources.

Happy conding!

share|improve this answer
    
If I open/initialize resources after the fork in the doMessages function, doesn't that solve the post-fork problem? What specifically is the code not addressing? I specifically tried to create code that I can use to avoid the problem, so if you are just copy pasting generic data from the php.net site that doesn't help in this specific example. –  Zak Jun 7 '11 at 20:21
    
I did not see code that checks for dead processes, although your tasks seem to be shortlived you should still be careful with how children's behavior is handled. Look very closely at the section 'parental responsabilities' on this page. I have used his code successfully to make small daemons and found this ressource more detailed than php.net's pcntl man pages. –  stefgosselin Jun 7 '11 at 20:34

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