Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use parser generator, which generates java classes representing syntax nodes of a programming language, and AspectJ aspects for adding semantics to these classes. I have extended/changed the grammar of the language and I want to reuse aspects of the old grammar and modify/extend them to cope with changes of node classes.

For example, an old node class and its aspect:

class A {
  public T a1;
  public U a2;
  ...
}

aspect Accessors1 {
  public T A.getT() {return a1;}
  public U A.getU() {return a2;}
}

With grammar modification, the class A is change followingly:

class A {
  public T a1;
  public V a2;
  public U a3;
  ...
}

I would like to reuse the Accessors1 aspect and add another one:

aspect Accessors2 {
  public V A.getV() {return a2;} // new accessor for new field
  public U A.getU() {return a3;} // modification of old accessor
}

I tried this:

declare precedence: *2, *1;

But I still get this error: Type mismatch: cannot convert from V to U from the first aspect. Even though the Accessors1.getU() is not used, it is still type-checked, which causes compilation to fail.

Why is that so? How can I override the original getU() with the new one? Is there a way to tell AspectJ to ignore/drop the Accessors1.getU()?

share|improve this question
    
are you parameterizing the class or are T, V, U real classes? –  Adam Gent Jun 7 '11 at 22:44
add comment

1 Answer 1

What if you try to use the following changes in second class:

class A {
  public T a1;
  public U a2;
  public V a3;
  ...
}

And the second aspect:

aspect Accessors2 {
  public V A.getV() {return a3;} // new accessor for new field
  public U A.getU() {return a2;} // modification of old accessor
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would be nice and easy solution to the problem, but as I mentioned, the classes are generated by parser generator.. and there is a LOT of them and hence a LOT of instances of the problem and of places to change... –  Jakub Stejskal Jun 7 '11 at 21:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.