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In Java, let's say I have a transaction that once it is committed, I want to do another action, in this case, send an email.

Therefore,

try {
    transaction.begin()
    ...
    transaction.commit()
    // point 1
    Utility.sendEmail(...)
} catch (Exception e) {
    transaction.rollback();
}

Is it possible for the thread to die/get killed at point 1 and not send an email ? Any way to minimize this ? JTA + JMS perhaps, where the action of sending a message is part of a transaction ? I'm investigating an issue and exploring whether this is possible. JVM is still alive (no OOM). I do not know the inner working of the app server so not sure if this is possible.

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1 Answer

I can't say for sure if the rollback() in the catch clause has any effect if the commit() was OK and sendEmail() threw an exception. The quickest way to test this is to throw an exception from the sendEmail() method and see if the transaction was actually committed.

The way I would put it though, is to move the sendEmail() call away from your try block:

try {
    transaction.begin()
    ...
    transaction.commit()
} catch (Exception e) {
    transaction.rollback();
}

try {
    // point 1
    Utility.sendEmail(...)
} catch (Exception e) {
    // handle it
}

This way you can control what will happen if a rollback was made.

Also, I think that sending the email to a JMS queue is in most cases a good idea. Doing it like that will give your DB code permission to continue and supposedly give feedback to your user that everything went OK and the email will be sent whenever it fits the email controller's schedule. For example, there might be a connection issue with your email server and the email sending would hang for say 30 seconds before throwing an exception and your user would see this as a very long button click.

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Let's assume sendMail doesn't throw an exception. Is it possible that the transaction is committed in the database, but an email is not sent, i.e. sendEmail isn't even called, thread dies just after it commits ? –  trix Jun 8 '11 at 5:57
    
There's also a chance that the database will rollback but the email will still send. –  Bryce Siedschlaw Jun 8 '11 at 5:58
    
@Bryce Siedschlaw Naturally, the coder should implement a boolean flag or a similar solution which would indicate whether the transaction was OK or not. I omitted this on purpose so that trix has something to figure out as well :D –  deltaforce2 Jun 8 '11 at 6:00
    
@trix There's always the miniscule chance that your app just dies (process is killed by a user, power is cut, the hammer of Thor hits the server, ...), but I don't see where that piece of code would just up and quit right after the transaction. Unless you code something there that just detonates the whole thing. –  deltaforce2 Jun 8 '11 at 6:03
    
@deltaforce2 The question is, is it possible for a running thread in a JVM to die/get killed. However JVM is still running (other threads are still running normally). So process is not killed by a user, power is not cut, Thor's hammer didn't struck the server. Is it so highly unlikely that it's pretty much impossible or is it quite likely that we have to code ways to get around it. –  trix Jun 9 '11 at 0:24
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