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I want to create an object like this:

var servers = 
{
  'local1' :
  {
    name: 'local1',
    ip: '10.10.10.1'
  },
  'local2' :
  {
    name: 'local2',
    ip: '10.10.10.2'
  }
}

This is what I'm doing

$.each( servers, function( key, server )
{
    servers[server.name] = server;
});

Where servers is an array of objects like these:

{
    name: 'local1',
    ip: '10.10.10.1'
}

But the code above does not assign any keys to the object, so the keys default to 0,1,2....

share|improve this question
    
There isn't a hint of JSON there, I've removed the references to it. –  Quentin Jun 8 '11 at 6:16
    
How you init servers? servers=[]? servers={} ? –  lord_t Jun 8 '11 at 6:24
    
servers = {}; –  gAMBOOKa Jun 8 '11 at 6:38
    
servers is not an array. It is an object. You assign objects to properties of this object that have the name server.name. What is actually your problem? What do you want to do? –  Felix Kling Jun 8 '11 at 7:12
    
@gAMBOOKa Why are you using jQuery on the server -.- –  Raynos Jun 8 '11 at 7:17

3 Answers 3

One potential bug I notice is that you're modifying the object that you are iterating over (servers). It might be good to create a new empty object that you modify in the loop.

Also, it'd help if you posted some sample data so we can run your code for ourselves.

Finally, you could try inserting a debugger keyword in there and stepping through the code.

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In Chrome if You run this:

a = [];
b = {n:"c",i:"1.2.3.4"};
a[b.n] = b;
alert (a["c"].i);
alert (a.c.i);

You will got the "1.2.3.4" string as expected. But if you change the example as:

a = {};
b = {n:"c",i:"1.2.3.4"};
a[b.n] = b;
alert (a.c.i);

You will get the same "1.2.3.4" again :). So the answer is: your code assigns the properties to the objects as you asked. The only difference is that in the first example you used the array as object, and in second the simple object.

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AFAIK [] in javascript is used to index arrays, while to access object properties you have to use dot notation. So your code should be:

$.each( servers, function( key, server )
{
    var name = server.name;
    eval("servers." + name + "  = server");
});

Please try it out since I don't test it.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is untrue. You can and typically should use dot notation to access properties of an object. In fact, under the hood, a JavaScript array is an object with keys 0, 1, 2, ... –  Geoff Jun 8 '11 at 6:20
    
Not true. The ecmascript spec says that dot and square bracket notation are equivalent. –  joekarl Jun 8 '11 at 6:21
2  
Eval is evil, don't use it! –  lord_t Jun 8 '11 at 6:22

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