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I'm trying to find certain keywords in a string with python. The string is something like this:

A was changed from B to C

all I'm trying to find is the "to C" part, where C is one of many thousand words.

This code builds the regexp string:

pre_pad = 'to '
regex_string = None
for i in words:
    if regex_string == None:
        regex_string = '\\b%s%s(?!-)(?!_)\\b' %(pre_pad, i)
    else:
        regex_string = regex_string + '|\\b%s%s(?!-)(?!_)\\b' %(pre_pad, i)

And later on I do:

matches = []
for match in re.finditer(r"%s" %regex_string, text):
        matches.append([match, MATCH_TYPE])

This code works on linux but crashes on macos with "Caught OverflowError while rendering: regular expression code size limit exceeded"

I realize that the regex_string is very long and that this is the cause of the problem

print regex_string.__len__()
63574

how can I fix this so this will always work, independent of the number of words?

EDIT:

I forgot to mention that the pre_pad is sometimes empty: pre_pad = '', so searching for pre_pad first is not always possible.

In addition to that, the reason why I build the entire regex_string first and then match it against the words is that I have to do this matching for many thousand entries. If I had to build the regex_string every single time again, this would lead to very poor performance.

Oh, and I need to know which word matches.

share|improve this question
    
It should never have even occurred to you to do this with a regex, what you're describing is not even remotely like what regexes are for. Just split the string on spaces and iterate through the words checking against a set or dict of the desired keywords. –  Nicholas Knight Jun 8 '11 at 10:12
    
won't this be way slower? –  memyself Jun 8 '11 at 10:17
2  
Why would it be slower? set and dict lookups are, by design, extremely fast (and must be, virtually everything you do in Python depends on a dict in some way), and I just split a 28MB string into a list of 4 million elements in approximately 1 second. Just how ginormous are your strings? Premature optimization accomplishes nothing but wasting valuable developer time, and usually ends up giving you sub-optimal code anyway. –  Nicholas Knight Jun 8 '11 at 10:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not supposed to be a task you can solve with a huge regexp and expect better performances than this:

pre_pad = 'to '
matches = []

for i in words:
    regex_string = '\\b%s%s(?!-)(?!_)\\b' % (pre_pad, i)
    for match in re.finditer(r"%s" % regex_string, text):
        matches.append([match, MATCH_TYPE])

Also if, after profiling your code you see chained regexp work faster calculate your regexp string length while building it and split the full task in 2, 3, 10 to avoid overflow.

P.S.:

print len(regex_string)

is more pythonic...

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to mention that the pre_pad is sometimes empty: pre_pad = '', so searching for pre_pad first is not always possible. In addition to that, the reason why I build the entire regex_string first and then match is against the words is that I have to do this matching for many thousand entries. If I had to build the regex_string every single time again, this would lead to very poor performance. –  memyself Jun 8 '11 at 10:05
    
@memyself: I can't get the pre_pad problem anyway my suggestion was to make a regex for each word or split the big one in chunks. Then fix the code accordingly. About very poor performances: did you profile to be sure about that? What's the performance loss in percentage and time? –  neurino Jun 8 '11 at 10:17
    
your solution runs ~ 1000 times slower than my solution. that is because words is a few thousand words. –  memyself Jun 8 '11 at 10:35
    
@ did you also tried splitting your big regex in chunkes that do not overflow? 1000 times slower anyway? Don't think so. Anyway I agree with Nicholas Knight that this is not a regex task. Moreover about my code above can you post profiling results to see where's the bottleneck? See here an example of quick and good profiling. –  neurino Jun 8 '11 at 10:57

You can extract C from your input by a simple regex and then look it up in a structure optimised for searching:

  • some tree
  • ordered list with binary search
  • hash structure (like python's set)

Something like

return match_from_regex in set_of_words
share|improve this answer
    
This is basically the updated aix's solution. I missed the update when posting my answer. –  Krab Jun 8 '11 at 10:03
    
that only works is pre_pad is not empty. if pre_pad is empty, then I still have to match every single word C. –  memyself Jun 8 '11 at 10:13
    
What's the problem? Just extract the word to check by a regex with empty pre_pad and then look it up. –  Krab Jun 8 '11 at 11:50

I would approach this problem a little differently to be honest. I would make a words map (which I can check if the word exists with O(1) complexity). then search for all " to [\w]+ " regex for getting every "to" matches in the big text. then for every match I would check if it exists in words map. Would be much more efficient I guess.

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I'm not a python expert, so my answer is not authoritative. However, it seems to me that regex is not the best tool in this case. If the structure of the string

A was changed from B to C

is fixed, then isn't it sufficient to use the in operator iterating over the words that you want to check:

>>> "to blue" in "A was changed from red to blue"
True
share|improve this answer

The problem as stated appears to lend itself very well to a non-regex solution.

Alternatively, iterate over matches for r'\b%s(\B+)(?!-)(?!_)\b' % pre_pad, and check that the word matched by the first group is in your dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you suggest an example? –  Krab Jun 8 '11 at 9:52
    
@Krab: Well, do a linear scan looking for pre_pad ('to '), and then check what's immediately before and after it. –  NPE Jun 8 '11 at 9:56
    
this will only work if pre_pad is not empty. But I also have cases where pre_pad is empty. –  memyself Jun 8 '11 at 10:14

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