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I have soap service under Apache with ssl, suds works greate without ssl.
I have client certificate (my.crt and user.p12 files).
How I need to configure suds client ot make it work with service over https?

without certs i see

urllib2.URLError: <urlopen error [Errno 1] _ssl.c:499: error:14094410:SSL routines:SSL3_READ_BYTES:sslv3 alert handshake failure>
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1  
It looks like it's relying on urllib2, which doesn't support such options. Note that urllib2 doesn't even verify the server certificate (see documentation), which you'd really need to do if you're serious about using HTTPS. –  Bruno Jun 8 '11 at 10:18
    
yep, but I can create my own transport based on other python library, which will use client certificate. What library you recomend instead of urllib2? –  Andrew Jun 8 '11 at 10:30
2  
There was a discussion here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6167148/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/1087227/… –  Bruno Jun 8 '11 at 11:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want to authenticate using a client certificate, not a server certificate as was stated in some of the comments. I had the same issue and was able to write a custom transport for SUDS. Here's the code that works for me.

You'll need your certificates in PEM format for this to work; OpenSSL can easily perform this conversion, though I don't remember the exact syntax.

import urllib2, httplib, socket
from suds.client import Client
from suds.transport.http import HttpTransport, Reply, TransportError

class HTTPSClientAuthHandler(urllib2.HTTPSHandler):
    def __init__(self, key, cert):
        urllib2.HTTPSHandler.__init__(self)
        self.key = key
        self.cert = cert

    def https_open(self, req):
        #Rather than pass in a reference to a connection class, we pass in
        # a reference to a function which, for all intents and purposes,
        # will behave as a constructor
        return self.do_open(self.getConnection, req)

    def getConnection(self, host, timeout=300):
        return httplib.HTTPSConnection(host,
                                       key_file=self.key,
                                       cert_file=self.cert)

class HTTPSClientCertTransport(HttpTransport):
    def __init__(self, key, cert, *args, **kwargs):
        HttpTransport.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
        self.key = key
        self.cert = cert

    def u2open(self, u2request):
        """
        Open a connection.
        @param u2request: A urllib2 request.
        @type u2request: urllib2.Requet.
        @return: The opened file-like urllib2 object.
        @rtype: fp
        """
        tm = self.options.timeout
        url = urllib2.build_opener(HTTPSClientAuthHandler(self.key, self.cert))
        if self.u2ver() < 2.6:
            socket.setdefaulttimeout(tm)
            return url.open(u2request)
        else:
            return url.open(u2request, timeout=tm)

# These lines enable debug logging; remove them once everything works.
import logging
logging.basicConfig(level=logging.INFO)
logging.getLogger('suds.client').setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
logging.getLogger('suds.transport').setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

c = Client('https://YOUR_URL_HERE',
    transport = HTTPSClientCertTransport('YOUR_KEY_AND_CERT.pem',
                                         'YOUR_KEY_AND_CERT.pem'))
print c
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excellent answer. this would be a good example for using client certificates. needs to be there in the SUDS docs. :-) –  Mahendra Sep 29 '11 at 8:23
2  
"It sounds like you want to authenticate using a client certificate, not a server certificate as was stated in some of the comments.". This code doesn't authenticate the server: essentially, you're sending your client cert to something, but you haven't verified what that something was. None of this authenticates the server, which should be done first, whether you use client certs or not. –  Bruno Jan 30 '12 at 11:51
1  
There is a small copyNpaste bug. instead of twice the param 'YOUR_KEY_AND_CERT.pem' it should be two filenames. First one to yout private key file, second one to the certificate chain file. both in unsecured .pem format. –  willsteel Aug 5 '13 at 19:37
    
@willsteel Actually, you can have both the private key and the certificate (public key) in the same PEM file -- you just append them one after the other. –  nitwit Aug 7 '13 at 7:34
    
very util for this question: PFX or P7B or DER to PEM converter: sslshopper.com/ssl-converter.html –  panchicore Apr 28 at 14:29

Another workaround is to use requests library as transport which has better support for ssl. This is what I'm using now to access SOAP services through https using suds:-

import requests
from suds.transport.http import HttpAuthenticated
from suds.transport import Reply, TransportError

class RequestsTransport(HttpAuthenticated):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.cert = kwargs.pop('cert', None)
        # super won't work because not using new style class
        HttpAuthenticated.__init__(self, **kwargs)

    def send(self, request):
        self.addcredentials(request)
        resp = requests.post(request.url, data=request.message,
                             headers=request.headers, cert=self.cert)
        result = Reply(resp.status_code, resp.headers, resp.content)
        return result

And then you can instantiate suds client as:-

headers = {"Content-TYpe" : "text/xml;charset=UTF-8",
           "SOAPAction" : ""}
t = RequestsTransport(cert='/path/to/cert', **credentials)
client = Client(wsdl_uri, location=send_url, headers=headers,
                transport=t))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice answer. I visited this question almost a year ago and used the urllib2 described in @nitwit's answer. I'm refactoring that code today and decided to switch the whole thing over to requests. Quick question: what is **credentials supposed to be on line 2? I removed it and I'm not having problems, but I'm still curious. –  mehaase Sep 20 '13 at 4:32
2  
That if your soap endpoint require http basic authentication, so credentials = {'username': 'yourname', 'password': 'yourpass'}. –  k4ml Sep 23 '13 at 14:50
    
I'm trying to run this and getting a ssl.SSLError: [Errno 1] _ssl.c:1359: error:14094410:SSL routines:SSL3_READ_BYTES:sslv3 alert handshake failure. I could access the same wsdl_url with a simple requests.get(wsdl_url, cert='/path/to/cert.pem', verify=False). Shouldn't the request to get the WSDL file be made with a GET? –  fiatjaf Nov 22 '13 at 16:16
1  
@AndreMiras You're correct. I have edited my answer. –  k4ml Dec 25 '13 at 0:08
1  
@GiovanniP, yes, you also need to override the open() method. I've edited the answer, I hope it gets accepted. –  Andre Miras Jan 10 at 10:20

Based on @k4ml answer, I've only added the open() which allows to fetch the WSDL using the certificate.

This method should fix the suds.transport.TransportError: HTTP Error 403: Forbidden when trying to fetch a WSDL (at Client creation) served behind a HTTPS service.

import requests
from suds.transport.http import HttpAuthenticated
from suds.transport import Reply, TransportError

class RequestsTransport(HttpAuthenticated):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.cert = kwargs.pop('cert', None)
        # super won't work because not using new style class
        HttpAuthenticated.__init__(self, **kwargs)

    def open(self, request):
        """
        Fetches the WSDL using cert.
        """
        self.addcredentials(request)
        resp = requests.get(request.url, data=request.message,
                             headers=request.headers, cert=self.cert)
        result = io.StringIO(resp.content.decode('utf-8'))
        return result

    def send(self, request):
        """
        Posts to service using cert.
        """
        self.addcredentials(request)
        resp = requests.post(request.url, data=request.message,
                             headers=request.headers, cert=self.cert)
        result = Reply(resp.status_code, resp.headers, resp.content)
        return result

Side note, I've also made a suggested edit to k4ml's answer, but it can take ages before it gets approved.

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I'm running the mentioned code by @nitwit, and it seems to fail with "Connection reset". Looks like its half working, as I get further than with incorrect certificates (in that case I get 403 forbidden).

Additional clarification: I tested the WS with Firefox&Chrome and in both cases I get a legit WSDL, but when I try to feed the same certificate to wget and use it to retrieve the WSDL I get the same "connection reset" problem.

Are there any gotchas I should be aware regarding accessing SOAP WS with certificates from an app (vs. accessing with a browser)?


This is an update of the original answer:

  1. I figured out that I have a problem with headers and server caused all the Connection resets. I eventually gave up on using SUDS.
  2. I found a very very nice library - pysimplesoap: http://code.google.com/p/pysimplesoap/, which also had issues with certificates, but the patch was very simple and everything just works.

Bottom line:

I chose not to use SUDS anymore due to issues with certificates. I think that the best library (especially for a noob like me) for consuming SOAP services which require certificates is patched pysimplesoap. Sooner or later they will integrate the support for the certificates into the library, but until then - use my patch: http://code.google.com/p/pysimplesoap/issues/detail?id=45

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1  
If you have a separate question, please post that as a new question on SO, not as an "answer" to a related question. Include the code you're using. –  mehaase Sep 20 '13 at 4:34
    
If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context. –  Jonathan Palumbo Aug 22 at 18:31
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Ian O'Brien Aug 22 at 19:09

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