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I'm use reg->SaveKey("Software", "D:\1.reg"). But getting empty file, without data.

void __fastcall TForm1::Button2Click(TObject *Sender)
{
      TRegistry *reg=new TRegistry(KEY_READ);
      reg->RootKey=HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE;
      reg->OpenKey("Software",0);;
      reg->SaveKey("Software","D:\\1.reg");
      delete reg;

}
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what is reg? what library do you use for accessing the registry? –  CharlesB Jun 8 '11 at 10:03
    
Library-TRegistry. TRegistry *reg=new TRegistry(KEY_ALL_ACCESS); –  Viktorianec Jun 8 '11 at 10:05
    
please provide more code. also KEY_READ may be sufficient, as it can be a permission problem –  CharlesB Jun 8 '11 at 10:13
    
OK. I edited my question. –  Viktorianec Jun 8 '11 at 11:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

SaveKey is a loose wrapper around RegSaveKey(), the documentation of which states:

The calling process must have the SE_BACKUP_NAME privilege enabled. For more information, see Running with Special Privileges.

User tokens do not normally have the SE_BACKUP_NAME privilege enabled. In order to meet this requirement you need to:

  1. Run as administrator.
  2. Add the SE_BACKUP_NAME privilege to your user token.

The other requirement you must adhere to is that the output file must not exist before you call SaveKey.

See this EDN article for C++ code illustrating the method.

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I set *reg to KEY_READ, but it's problem remained. –  Viktorianec Jun 8 '11 at 11:33
2  
You don't need to call OpenKey since you specify the key in SaveKey. SaveKey is a loose wrapper around the Win32 API RegSaveKey. Try to call RegSaveKey directly and then look at the error code that it returns to see why it is failing. –  David Heffernan Jun 8 '11 at 11:45
    
Another point. I have already, in a previous question, told you about KEY_ALL_ACCESS. Please can you read more carefully the advice you are given so as not to make the same mistakes again and again. –  David Heffernan Jun 8 '11 at 11:46
    
Yet another. Why are you doing this? What's wrong with regedit or reg save? –  David Heffernan Jun 8 '11 at 11:47
1  
You are running with UAC I presume and even though you are an admin, a standard process doesn't run with admin privileges. Run it elevated and it will work. You can see exactly this if you use reg save to do the same action. In fact, why are you know doing reg save? –  David Heffernan Jun 8 '11 at 12:16

Don't you have to use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software or similar? "Software" exists in more than one place e.g. HKLM and HKCU.

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Hmm. I set reg->rootkey=HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE –  Viktorianec Jun 8 '11 at 10:14
    
@Viktor_coder: These sorts of details need to be in your question. We are not psychic. Please press the "edit" link under your question body and provide all relevant context. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 8 '11 at 10:31

Next variant worked!

void __fastcall TForm1::Button2Click(TObject *Sender)
{
TRegistry *reg=new TRegistry(KEY_READ);
HANDLE ProcessToken;

if (OpenProcessToken(GetCurrentProcess(), TOKEN_ADJUST_PRIVILEGES | TOKEN_QUERY, &ProcessToken))
{
    SetPrivilege(ProcessToken, SE_BACKUP_NAME, TRUE);
          TRegistry *reg=new TRegistry(KEY_READ);
      reg->RootKey=HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE;
      reg->SaveKey("Software","D:\\1.reg");
      delete reg;
}



}
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