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I want to include batch file rename functionality in my application. User can type destination filename pattern and (after replacing some wildcards in pattern) I need to check if it's going to be legal filename under Windows. I tried to use regular expression like [a-zA-Z0-9_]+ but it doesn't include many national-specific characters from various languages (umlauts and so on). What is the best way to do such check?

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19 Answers 19

up vote 58 down vote accepted

You can get a list of invalid characters from Path.GetInvalidPathChars

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.path.getinvalidpathchars.aspx

And GetInvalidFileNameChars

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.path.getinvalidfilenamechars.aspx

UPD: See Steve Cooper's suggestion on how to use these in a regular expression.

UPD2: Note that according to the Remarks section in MSDN "The array returned from this method is not guaranteed to contain the complete set of characters that are invalid in file and directory names." The answer provided by sixlettervaliables goes into more details.

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4  
This does not answer the question; there are many strings consisting only of valid characters (e.g. "....", "CON", strings hundreds of chars long) that are not valid filenames. –  Dour High Arch Jul 21 '13 at 17:57
3  
Anyone else disappointed that MS doesn't provide system level function/API for this capability instead of each developer has to cook his/her own solution? Wondering if there's a very good reason for this or just an oversight on MS part. –  Thomas Nguyen Mar 21 at 17:29

From MSDN's "Naming a File or Directory," here are the general conventions for what a legal file name is under Windows:

You may use any character in the current code page (Unicode/ANSI above 127), except:

  • < > : " / \ | ? *
  • Characters whose integer representations are 0-31 (less than ASCII space)
  • Any other character that the target file system does not allow (say, trailing periods or spaces)
  • Any of the DOS names: CON, PRN, AUX, NUL, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6, COM7, COM8, COM9, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, LPT4, LPT5, LPT6, LPT7, LPT8, LPT9 (and avoid AUX.txt, etc)
  • The file name is all periods

Some optional things to check:

  • File paths (including the file name) may not have more than 260 characters (that don't use the "\?\" prefix)
  • Unicode file paths (including the file name) with more than 32,000 characters when using "\?\" (note that prefix may expand directory components and cause it to overflow the 32,000 limit)
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2  
+1 for including reserved filenames - those were missed in previous answers. –  SqlRyan Apr 20 '09 at 14:41
2  
"AUX" is a perfectly usable filename if you use the "\\?\" syntax. Of course, programs that don't use that syntax have real problems dealing with it... (Tested on XP) –  user9876 Dec 2 '09 at 13:19
1  
How about "CLOCK$" ? –  papaiatis Jan 6 at 10:24

For .Net Frameworks prior to 3.5 this should work:

Regular expression matching should get you some of the way. Here's a snippet using the System.IO.Path.InvalidPathChars constant;

bool IsValidFilename(string testName)
{
    Regex containsABadCharacter = new Regex("[" 
          + Regex.Escape(System.IO.Path.InvalidPathChars) + "]");
    if (containsABadCharacter.IsMatch(testName) { return false; };

    // other checks for UNC, drive-path format, etc

    return true;
}

For .Net Frameworks after 3.0 this should work:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.path.getinvalidpathchars(v=vs.90).aspx

Regular expression matching should get you some of the way. Here's a snippet using the System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars() constant;

bool IsValidFilename(string testName)
{
    Regex containsABadCharacter = new Regex("["
          + Regex.Escape(new string(System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars())) + "]");
    if (containsABadCharacter.IsMatch(testName) { return false; };

    // other checks for UNC, drive-path format, etc

    return true;
}

Once you know that, you should also check for different formats, eg c:\my\drive and \\server\share\dir\file.ext

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doesn't this only test the path, not the filename? –  Eugene Katz Sep 17 '08 at 12:57
1  
This API is obsolete, downvoted. –  casperOne Jan 7 '09 at 21:12
18  
string strTheseAreInvalidFileNameChars = new string( System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars() ) ; Regex regFixFileName = new Regex("[" + Regex.Escape(strTheseAreInvalidFileNameChars ) + "]"); –  rao Oct 19 '10 at 14:36
2  
A little research from people would work wonders. I've updated the post to reflect the changes. –  Erik Philips Dec 22 '13 at 6:03
1  
2nd piece of code doesn't compile. "Cannot convert from char[] to string –  Paul Hunt Apr 25 at 12:03

Try to use it, and trap for the error. The allowed set may change across file systems, or across different versions of Windows. In other words, if you want know if Windows likes the name, hand it the name and let it tell you.

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1  
This seems to be the only one that tests against all constraints. Why are the other answers being chosen over this? –  gap Mar 7 '12 at 14:53
    
@gap because it doesn't always work. For example, trying to access CON will often succeed, even though it's not a real file. –  Antimony Oct 1 '12 at 14:51
    
It's always better to avoid the memory overhead of throwing an Exception, where possible, though. –  Owen Blacker Oct 2 '12 at 15:40

This is what I use:

    public static bool IsValidFileName(this string expression, bool platformIndependent)
    {
        string sPattern = @"^(?!^(PRN|AUX|CLOCK\$|NUL|CON|COM\d|LPT\d|\..*)(\..+)?$)[^\x00-\x1f\\?*:\"";|/]+$";
        if (platformIndependent)
        {
           sPattern = @"^(([a-zA-Z]:|\\)\\)?(((\.)|(\.\.)|([^\\/:\*\?""\|<>\. ](([^\\/:\*\?""\|<>\. ])|([^\\/:\*\?""\|<>]*[^\\/:\*\?""\|<>\. ]))?))\\)*[^\\/:\*\?""\|<>\. ](([^\\/:\*\?""\|<>\. ])|([^\\/:\*\?""\|<>]*[^\\/:\*\?""\|<>\. ]))?$";
        }
        return (Regex.IsMatch(expression, sPattern, RegexOptions.CultureInvariant));
    }

The first pattern creates a regular expression containing the invalid/illegal file names and characters for Windows platforms only. The second one does the same but ensures that the name is legal for any platform.

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One corner case to keep in mind, which surprised me when I first found out about it: Windows allows leading space characters in file names! For example, the following are all legal, and distinct, file names on Windows (minus the quotes):

"file.txt"
" file.txt"
"  file.txt"

One takeaway from this: Use caution when writing code that trims leading/trailing whitespace from a filename string.

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This class cleans filenames and paths; use it like

var myCleanPath = PathSanitizer.SanitizeFilename(myBadPath, ' ');

Here's the code;

/// <summary>
/// Cleans paths of invalid characters.
/// </summary>
public static class PathSanitizer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The set of invalid filename characters, kept sorted for fast binary search
    /// </summary>
    private readonly static char[] invalidFilenameChars;
    /// <summary>
    /// The set of invalid path characters, kept sorted for fast binary search
    /// </summary>
    private readonly static char[] invalidPathChars;

    static PathSanitizer()
    {
        // set up the two arrays -- sorted once for speed.
        invalidFilenameChars = System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars();
        invalidPathChars = System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars();
        Array.Sort(invalidFilenameChars);
        Array.Sort(invalidPathChars);

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Cleans a filename of invalid characters
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input">the string to clean</param>
    /// <param name="errorChar">the character which replaces bad characters</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static string SanitizeFilename(string input, char errorChar)
    {
        return Sanitize(input, invalidFilenameChars, errorChar);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Cleans a path of invalid characters
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input">the string to clean</param>
    /// <param name="errorChar">the character which replaces bad characters</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static string SanitizePath(string input, char errorChar)
    {
        return Sanitize(input, invalidPathChars, errorChar);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Cleans a string of invalid characters.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input"></param>
    /// <param name="invalidChars"></param>
    /// <param name="errorChar"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static string Sanitize(string input, char[] invalidChars, char errorChar)
    {
        // null always sanitizes to null
        if (input == null) { return null; }
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var characterToTest in input)
        {
            // we binary search for the character in the invalid set. This should be lightning fast.
            if (Array.BinarySearch(invalidChars, characterToTest) >= 0)
            {
                // we found the character in the array of 
                result.Append(errorChar);
            }
            else
            {
                // the character was not found in invalid, so it is valid.
                result.Append(characterToTest);
            }
        }

        // we're done.
        return result.ToString();
    }

}
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your answer could be better fit here:stackoverflow.com/questions/146134/… –  nawfal Jun 12 '13 at 12:37

Rather than explicitly include all possible characters, you could do a regex to check for the presence of illegal characters, and report an error then. Ideally your application should name the files exactly as the user wishes, and only cry foul if it stumbles across an error.

Illegal characters in Windows filenames

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Your link doesn't work anymore (at least for me) –  bernhardrusch Oct 8 '09 at 12:35
    
Link updated now –  ConroyP Oct 8 '09 at 22:39
2  
Link does not work anymore again. –  Jens Oct 12 '11 at 9:15

Microsoft Windows: Windows kernel forbids the use of characters in range 1-31 (i.e., 0x01-0x1F) and characters " * : < > ? \ |. Although NTFS allows each path component (directory or filename) to be 255 characters long and paths up to about 32767 characters long, the Windows kernel only supports paths up to 259 characters long. Additionally, Windows forbids the use of the MS-DOS device names AUX, CLOCK$, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6, COM7, COM8, COM9, CON, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, LPT4, LPT5, LPT6, LPT7, LPT8, LPT9, NUL and PRN, as well as these names with any extension (for example, AUX.txt), except when using Long UNC paths (ex. \.\C:\nul.txt or \?\D:\aux\con). (In fact, CLOCK$ may be used if an extension is provided.) These restrictions only apply to Windows - Linux, for example, allows use of " * : < > ? \ | even in NTFS.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filename

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Also CON, PRN, AUX, NUL, COM# and a few others are never legal filenames in any directory with any extension.

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This is only half of the truth. You can create files with these names if calling the unicode version of CreateFile (prefixing the file name with "\\?\"). –  Werner Henze Apr 30 '13 at 9:12

The question is are you trying to determine if a path name is a legal windows path, or if it's legal on the system where the code is running.? I think the latter is more important, so personally, I'd probably decompose the full path and try to use _mkdir to create the directory the file belongs in, then try to create the file.

This way you know not only if the path contains only valid windows characters, but if it actually represents a path that can be written by this process.

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From MSDN, here's a list of characters that aren't allowed:

Use almost any character in the current code page for a name, including Unicode characters and characters in the extended character set (128–255), except for the following:

  • The following reserved characters are not allowed: < > : " / \ | ? *
  • Characters whose integer representations are in the range from zero through 31 are not allowed.
  • Any other character that the target file system does not allow.
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Also the destination file system is important.

Under NTFS, some files can not be created in specific directories. E.G. $Boot in root

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1  
Surely that's not due to an NTFS naming rule, but merely because a file called $Boot already exists in the directory? –  Christian Hayter Aug 23 '10 at 20:24

To complement the other answers, here are a couple of additional edge cases that you might want to consider.

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This is an already answered question, but just for the sake of "Other options", here's a non-ideal one:

(non-ideal because using Exceptions as flow control is a "Bad Thing", generally)

public static bool IsLegalFilename(string name)
{
    try 
    {
        var fileInfo = new FileInfo(name);
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}
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I use this to get rid of invalid characters in filenames without throwing exceptions:

private static readonly Regex InvalidFileRegex = new Regex(
    string.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(@"<>:""/\|?*")));

public static string SanitizeFileName(string fileName)
{
    return InvalidFileRegex.Replace(fileName, string.Empty);
}
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Windows filenames are pretty unrestrictive, so really it might not even be that much of an issue. The characters that are disallowed by Windows are:

\ / : * ? " < > |

You could easily write an expression to check if those characters are present. A better solution though would be to try and name the files as the user wants, and alert them when a filename doesn't stick.

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How about \r \n etc? –  Benjol Aug 6 '09 at 5:47
    
Also characters <= 31 are forbidden. –  Antimony Oct 1 '12 at 14:52

Regular expressions are overkill for this situation. You can use the String.IndexOfAny() method in combination with Path.GetInvalidPathChars() and Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars().

Also note that both Path.GetInvalidXXX() methods clone an internal array and return the clone. So if you're going to be doing this a lot (thousands and thousands of times) you can cache a copy of the invalid chars array for reuse.

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Keep in mind that even if the user enters a semantically valid path, this does not mean that they will have permissions to create that file, or even if the semantically valid path can even be created.

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