Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assumption:

Converting a byte[] from Little Endian to Big Endian means inverting the order of the bits in each byte of the byte[].

Assuming this is correct, I tried the following to understand this:

byte[] data = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 15, 24 };
byte[] inverted = ToBig(data);

var little = new BitArray(data);
var big = new BitArray(inverted);

int i = 1;

foreach (bool b in little)
{
    Console.Write(b ? "1" : "0");
    if (i == 8)
    {
        i = 0;
        Console.Write(" ");
    }
    i++;
}

Console.WriteLine();

i = 1;

foreach (bool b in big)
{
    Console.Write(b ? "1" : "0");
    if (i == 8)
    {
        i = 0;
        Console.Write(" ");
    }
    i++;
}

Console.WriteLine();

Console.WriteLine(BitConverter.ToString(data));
Console.WriteLine(BitConverter.ToString(ToBig(data)));

foreach (byte b in data)
{
    Console.Write("{0} ", b);
}

Console.WriteLine();

foreach (byte b in inverted)
{
    Console.Write("{0} ", b);
}

The convert method:

private static byte[] ToBig(byte[] data)
{
    byte[] inverted = new byte[data.Length];

    for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
    {
        var bits = new BitArray(new byte[] { data[i] });
        var invertedBits = new BitArray(bits.Count);

        int x = 0;

        for (int p = bits.Count - 1; p >= 0; p--)
        {
            invertedBits[x] = bits[p];
            x++;
        }

        invertedBits.CopyTo(inverted, i);
    }

    return inverted;
}

The output of this little application is different from what I expected:

00000001 00000010 00000011 00000100 00000101 00001111 00011000

00000001 00000010 00000011 00000100 00000101 00001111 00011000 

80-40-C0-20-A0-F0-18

01-02-03-04-05-0F-18

1 2 3 4 5 15 24 

1 2 3 4 5 15 24

For some reason the data remains the same, unless printed using BitConverter.

What am I not understanding?

Update

New code produces the following output:

10000000 01000000 11000000 00100000 10100000 11110000 00011000 

00000001 00000010 00000011 00000100 00000101 00001111 00011000 

01-02-03-04-05-0F-18

80-40-C0-20-A0-F0-18

1 2 3 4 5 15 24 

128 64 192 32 160 240 24

But as I have been told now, my method is incorrect anyway because I should invert the bytes and not the bits?

This hardware developer I'm working with told me to invert the bits because he cannot read the data.

Context where I'm using this

The application that will use this does not really work with numbers.

I'm supposed to save a stream of bits to file where

1 = white and 0 = black.

They represent pixels of a bitmap 256x64.

byte 0 to byte 31 represents the first row of pixels byte 32 to byte 63 the second row of pixels.

I have code that outputs these bits... but the developer is telling me they are in the wrong order... He says the bytes are fine but the bits are not.

So I'm left confused :p

share|improve this question
    
FYI, endianess refers to order of bytes in a word, not bits in a byte. –  Michael Mar 9 '09 at 19:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your method may be correct at this point. There are different meanings of endianness, and it depends on the hardware.

Typically, it's used for converting between computing platforms. Most CPU vendors (now) use the same bit ordering, but different byte ordering, for different chipsets. This means, that, if you are passing a 2-byte int from one system to another, you leave the bits alone, but swap bytes 1 and 2, ie:

int somenumber -> byte[2]: somenumber[high],somenumber[low] ->  
byte[2]: somenumber[low],somenumber[high] -> int newNumber

However, this isn't always true. Some hardware still uses inverted BIT ordering, so what you have may be correct. You'll need to either trust your hardware dev. or look into it further.

I recommend reading up on this on Wikipedia - always a great source of info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness


Your ToBig method has a bug.

At the end:

 invertedBits.CopyTo(data, i);
}

return data;

You need to change that to:

byte[] newData = new byte[data.Length];
invertedBits.CopyTo(newData, i);
}
return newData;

You're resetting your input data, so you're receiving both arrays inverted. The problem is that arrays are reference types, so you can modify the original data.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the code... result remains the same though –  TimothyP Mar 9 '09 at 19:58
    
Oh wait it is not haha sorry –  TimothyP Mar 9 '09 at 19:59
    
Ok so this works better, but I'm doing it wrong anyway beecause I have to invert the bytes instead of the bits? –  TimothyP Mar 9 '09 at 20:01
    
That is correct. The order of the bytes needs to be switched, the order of the bits should remain the same. –  James Van Huis Mar 9 '09 at 20:04
    
I just tested it - your current code works (1st & 3rd prints), but with one exception: The ToString() methods aren't giving what you expect because they're converting the byte[] reference itself, not the contents of the array, to a string. –  Reed Copsey Mar 9 '09 at 20:11

No. Endianness refers to the order of bytes, not bits. Big endian systems store the most-significant byte first and little-endian systems store the least-significant first. The bits within a byte remain in the same order.

Your ToBig() function is returning the original data rather than the bit-swapped data, it seems.

share|improve this answer

As greyfade already said, endianness is not about bit ordering.

The reason that your code doesn't do what you expect, is that the ToBig method changes the array that you send to it. That means that after calling the method the array is inverted, and data and inverted are just two references pointing to the same array.

Here's a corrected version of the method.

private static byte[] ToBig(byte[] data) {
   byte[] result = new byte[data.length];
   for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++) {
      var bits = new BitArray(new byte[] { data[i] });
      var invertedBits = new BitArray(bits.Count);
      int x = 0;
      for (int p = bits.Count - 1; p >= 0; p--) {
         invertedBits[x] = bits[p];
         x++;
      }
      invertedBits.CopyTo(result, i);
   }
   return result;
}

Edit:
Here's a method that changes endianness for a byte array:

static byte[] ConvertEndianness(byte[] data, int wordSize) {
	if (data.Length % wordSize != 0) throw new ArgumentException("The data length does not divide into an even number of words.");
	byte[] result = new byte[data.Length];
	int offset = wordSize - 1;
	for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++) {
		result[i + offset] = data[i];
		offset -= 2;
		if (offset < -wordSize) {
			offset += wordSize * 2;
		}
	}
	return result;
}

Example:

byte[] data = { 1,2,3,4,5,6 };
byte[] inverted = ConvertEndianness(data, 2);
Console.WriteLine(BitConverter.ToString(inverted));

Output:

02-01-04-03-06-05

The second parameter is the word size. As endianness is the ordering of bytes in a word, you have to specify how large the words are.

Edit 2:
Here is a more efficient method for reversing the bits:

static byte[] ReverseBits(byte[] data) {
	byte[] result = new byte[data.Length];
	for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++) {
		int b = data[i];
		int r = 0;
		for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
			r <<= 1;
			r |= b & 1;
			b >>= 1;
		}
		result[i] = (byte)r;
	}
	return result;
}
share|improve this answer

One big problem I see is ToBig changes the contents of the data[] array that is passed to it.

You're calling ToBig on an array named data, then assigning the result to inverted, but since you didn't create a new array inside ToBig, you modified both arrays, then you proceed to treat the arrays data and inverted as different when in reality they are not.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok let me just update that code –  TimothyP Mar 9 '09 at 19:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.