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I want to read a binary file that its size is 5.5 megabyte(a mp3 file). I tried it with fileinputstream but it took many attempts. If possible, I want to read file with a minimal waste of time.

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Of course it's possible. What's your specific problem? What does "it take many times" mean? –  musiKk Jun 8 '11 at 10:48
    
for example when i want to read that file it takes 5 minute that's not good.i want to read it in a less munutes –  Mahdi_Nine Jun 8 '11 at 10:49
    
Is it a local file? –  andyb Jun 8 '11 at 10:51
    
So it's not the network that is causing the slow read. Can we see your existing code? –  andyb Jun 8 '11 at 11:00
    
i solve that.thanks my friend –  Mahdi_Nine Jun 8 '11 at 11:06

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Try this:

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    InputStream i = new FileInputStream("a.mp3");
    byte[] contents = new byte[i.available()];
    i.read(contents);
    i.close();
}

A more reliable version based on helpful comment from @Paul Cager & Liv related to available's and read's unreliability.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    File f = new File("c:\\msdia80.dll");
    InputStream i = new FileInputStream(f);
    byte[] contents = new byte[(int) f.length()];

    int read;
    int pos = 0;
    while ((read = i.read(contents, pos, contents.length - pos)) >= 1)
    {
        pos += read;
    }
    i.close();
}
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4  
That is not safe code. InputStream.available() "Returns an estimate of the number of bytes that can be read (or skipped over) from this input stream without blocking by the next invocation of a method for this input stream." That is not necessarily the same as the size of the file. –  Paul Cager Jun 8 '11 at 10:56
1  
I'm really curious how the original approach looked like. :) –  musiKk Jun 8 '11 at 10:56
3  
Agree with Paul Cager. In fact read(byte[] buffer) will not read up to the limit of buffer -- instead will read as many bytes as are available! So you could end up reading just a few bytes and not the whole file. –  Liv Jun 8 '11 at 11:02
1  
One last comment -- the above won't work with huge files -- where f.length() returns a size bigger than Integer.MAX_VALUE -- but I'll let you off on that since @mehdi mentioned a few Mb only in size. –  Liv Jun 8 '11 at 11:10
1  
@Liv, for files greater than 2GB, you migh not be interested in storing that in memory anyhow. This can go on forever 32bit vs 64-bit a.s.o. Thanks for the pointers thought, upvoted u :) –  Nick Jun 8 '11 at 11:12

You should try to use a BufferedInputStream around your FileInputStream. It will improve the performance significantly.

new BufferedInputStream(fileInputStream, 8192 /* default buffer size */);

Furthermore, I'd recommend to use the read-method that takes a byte array and fills it instead of the plain read.

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3  
The default is 8192, perhaps you were thinking of 4096. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 8 '11 at 10:58
1  
Thanks for the hint. I updated my answer. –  Sebastian Zarnekow Jun 8 '11 at 11:40

There are useful utilities in FileUtils for reading a file at once. This is simpler and efficient for modest files up to 100 MB.

byte[] bytes = FileUtils.readFileToByteArray(file); // handles IOException/close() etc.
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