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I know I can call linq's Except and specify a custom IEqualityComparer, but implementing a new Comparer class for each data type seems like an overkill for this purpose. Can I use a lambda expression to provide the equality function, like when I use Where or other LINQ functions?

If I can't, is there an alternative?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't think you can directly with the basic LINQ interfaces, but I've seen people implement a LambdaComparer class with extension methods which will help you do it.

Here's an example

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Is there any reason I need to impement GetHash? –  Louis Rhys Jun 8 '11 at 11:47

Can you not use a .Where with a lambda that filters out your required values?

Example as requested:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var firstCustomers = new[] { new Customer { Id = 1, Name = "Bob" }, new Customer { Id = 2, Name = "Steve" } };
        var secondCustomers = new[] { new Customer { Id = 2, Name = "Steve" }, new Customer { Id = 3, Name = "John" } };

        var customers = secondCustomers.Where(c => !firstCustomers.Select(fc => fc.Id).Contains(c.Id));
    }

    public class Customer
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
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how can I do it? I want to filter out items whose ids do not appear in another collection. –  Louis Rhys Jun 8 '11 at 11:15
    
This implementation is computationally expensive - for every customer in secondCustomers, it potentially evaluates every customer in firstCustomers. As the complexity is O(n^2), this will be noticeable when the collections are large. This is why the Intersect operator in LINQ uses a Set, seeded with the provided equality comparer, which uses GetHashCode. –  Niall Connaughton Aug 6 at 0:33

For any one still looking; here's another way of implementing a custom lambda comparer.

public class LambdaComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
    {
        private readonly Func<T, T, bool> _expression;

        public LambdaComparer(Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
        {
            _expression = lambda;
        }

        public bool Equals(T x, T y)
        {
            return _expression(x, y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(T obj)
        {
            /*
             If you just return 0 for the hash the Equals comparer will kick in. 
             The underlying evaluation checks the hash and then short circuits the evaluation if it is false.
             Otherwise, it checks the Equals. If you force the hash to be true (by assuming 0 for both objects), 
             you will always fall through to the Equals check which is what we are always going for.
            */
            return 0;
        }
    }

you can then create an extension for the linq Except an Intersect that take in lambda's

/// <summary>
        /// Returns all items in the first collection except the ones in the second collection that match the lambda condition
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">The type</typeparam>
        /// <param name="listA">The first list</param>
        /// <param name="listB">The second list</param>
        /// <param name="lambda">The filter expression</param>
        /// <returns>The filtered list</returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> Except<T>(this IEnumerable<T> listA, IEnumerable<T> listB, Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
        {
            return listA.Except(listB, new LambdaComparer<T>(lambda));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns all items in the first collection that intersect the ones in the second collection that match the lambda condition
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">The type</typeparam>
        /// <param name="listA">The first list</param>
        /// <param name="listB">The second list</param>
        /// <param name="lambda">The filter expression</param>
        /// <returns>The filtered list</returns>
        public static IEnumerable<T> Intersect<T>(this IEnumerable<T> listA, IEnumerable<T> listB, Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
        {
            return listA.Intersect(listB, new LambdaComparer<T>(lambda));
        }

Usage:

var availableItems = allItems.Except(filterItems, (p, p1) => p.Id== p1.Id);
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Here's something simple I whipped up:

public class CustomComparer<TSource, TCompareType> : IEqualityComparer<TSource> where TSource : class 
{
    private readonly Func<TSource, TCompareType> getComparisonObject;
    public CustomComparer(Func<TSource,TCompareType> getComparisonObject)
    {
        if (getComparisonObject == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("getComparisonObject");
        this.getComparisonObject = getComparisonObject;
    } 

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the specified objects are equal.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the specified objects are equal; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="x">The first object of type <paramref name="T"/> to compare.
    ///                 </param><param name="y">The second object of type <paramref name="T"/> to compare.
    ///                 </param>
    public bool Equals(TSource x, TSource y)
    {
        if (x == null)
        {
            return (y == null);
        }
        else if (y == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return EqualityComparer<TCompareType>.Default.Equals(getComparisonObject(x), getComparisonObject(y));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns a hash code for the specified object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A hash code for the specified object.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="obj">The <see cref="T:System.Object"/> for which a hash code is to be returned.
    ///                 </param><exception cref="T:System.ArgumentNullException">The type of <paramref name="obj"/> is a reference type and <paramref name="obj"/> is null.
    ///                 </exception>
    public int GetHashCode(TSource obj)
    {
        return EqualityComparer<TCompareType>.Default.GetHashCode(getComparisonObject(obj));
    }
}

Usage:

var myItems = allItems.Except(theirItems, new CustomComparer(item => item.Name));
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Use an extension!

public static IEnumerable<T> Except<T, TKey>(this IEnumerable<T> items, IEnumerable<T> other, 
                                                                            Func<T, TKey> getKey)
{
    return from item in items
           join otherItem in other on getKey(item)
           equals getKey(otherItem) into tempItems
           from temp in tempItems.DefaultIfEmpty()
           where ReferenceEquals(null, temp) || temp.Equals(default(T))
           select item;

}

Source

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