Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have o/p like

19599 user  20   0  120m  32m 4260 S 14.0  5.3   3:21.13 app.out  \t Wed Jun  8 09:31:06 UTC 2011
19599 user  20   0  120m  32m 4260 S 14.0  5.4   3:21.61 app.out  \t Wed Jun  8 09:31:12 UTC 2011
19599 user  20   0  121m  32m 4260 S 12.0  5.4   3:22.31 app.out  \t Wed Jun  8 09:31:17 UTC 2011

I want to remove all character starting from \t in the line. How can I do that with sed?

I tried with awk -F t '{print $1}' but it removing t from app.out .

I want o/p like

19599 user  20   0  120m  32m 4260 S 14.0  5.3   3:21.13 app.out
19599 user  20   0  120m  32m 4260 S 14.0  5.4   3:21.61 app.out
19599 user  20   0  121m  32m 4260 S 12.0  5.4   3:22.31 app.out

If I wrote the awk like this:

 awk -F t '{print $1"t"}'

it works fine, but it is only a work around. How can I remove all character starting from \t in the line till end of line?

share|improve this question
2  
what do you want to leave in the line? I mean show an example it is not so easy to find \t here) –  Good.Dima Jun 8 '11 at 14:00
    
@Good.Dima updated my question. –  Vivek Goel Jun 8 '11 at 14:13
1  
Is the \t actually a tab character or the sequence backslash and 't'? –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 8 '11 at 14:58
    
it is sequence of \t –  Vivek Goel Jun 8 '11 at 16:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the output contains the two characters backslash and 't', then you use:

sed 's/ *\\t.*//'

This removes the blanks leading up to the two characters, the backslash and the 't', plus everything after them.

If the output contains a tab character, then you need to replace the '\\t' with an actual tab character.

share|improve this answer

It sounds like you want the first field in a tab-delimited text. You might try one of:

cut -d $'\t' -f 1
awk -F '\t' '{print $1}'
sed $'s/\t.*//'

The $'' syntax is used in bash (and ksh and zsh I believe) to more easily allow for embedding escape sequences in strings.

share|improve this answer
awk 'BEGIN { FS = "\t" } 1 == 1 {print $1}' file.name
share|improve this answer
    
sorry . It is not working I am getting \t Wed Jun 8 09:30:55 UTC 2011 19599 user 20 0 121m 32m 4260 S 8.0 5.4 3:20.54 app.out \t Wed Jun 8 09:31:01 UTC 2011 –  Vivek Goel Jun 8 '11 at 14:14

Just pipe it through:

sed 's/\(.*\)\t.*/\1/'
share|improve this answer
    
nops don't work . I get same result. –  Vivek Goel Jun 8 '11 at 14:01
    
I am getting \t Wed Jun 8 09:30:55 UTC 2011 19599 user 20 0 121m 32m 4260 S 8.0 5.4 3:20.54 app.out \t Wed Jun 8 09:31:01 UTC 2011 19599 user 20 0 120m 32m 4260 S 14.0 5.3 3:21.13 app.out \t Wed Jun 8 09:31:06 UTC 2011 –  Vivek Goel Jun 8 '11 at 14:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.