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I'm trying to understand exceptions in Ruby but I'm a little confused. The tutorial I'm using says that if an exception occurs that does not match any of the exceptions identified by the rescue statements, you can use an "else" to catch it:

begin  
# -  
rescue OneTypeOfException  
# -  
rescue AnotherTypeOfException  
# -  
else  
# Other exceptions
ensure
# Always will be executed
end

However, I also saw later in the tutorial "rescue" being used without an exception specified:

begin
    file = open("/unexistant_file")
    if file
         puts "File opened successfully"
    end
rescue
    file = STDIN
end
print file, "==", STDIN, "\n"

If you can do this, then do I ever need to use else? Or can I just use a generic rescue at the end like this?

begin  
# -  
rescue OneTypeOfException  
# -  
rescue AnotherTypeOfException  
# -  
rescue
# Other exceptions
ensure
# Always will be executed
end
share|improve this question
4  
What's the tutorial, so I know not to recommend it? – Andrew Grimm Jun 8 '11 at 23:42
1  
@AndrewGrimm After some Googling, I think the tutorial the asker was following was tutorialspoint.com/ruby/ruby_exceptions.htm. Bonus WTF: the author of that tutorial seems to have plagiarised the first example from rubylearning.com/satishtalim/ruby_exceptions.html (where it was already incorrect), but made it worse still by screwing up the indentation of the comments. And yes, I think it'd be wise to steer people away from it - what a great combination of incompetence and dishonesty on display! – Mark Amery Dec 9 '15 at 19:51
up vote 51 down vote accepted

The else is for when the block completes without an exception thrown. The ensure is run whether the block completes successfully or not. Example:

begin
  puts "Hello, world!"
rescue
  puts "rescue"
else
  puts "else"
ensure
  puts "ensure"
end

This will print Hello, world!, then else, then ensure.

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1  
Why include the else portion in the begin block? – Antarr Byrd Jul 28 '15 at 16:50
    
@AntarrByrd In Ruby, begin is like try in other languages. The else, here, means, do this if no exceptions have been thrown in that begin (try) block. – Chris Jester-Young Jul 28 '15 at 16:52
    
But if the code in the begin block does not throw an error. You can continue there since thats the only case in which it will run. – Antarr Byrd Jul 28 '15 at 16:54
3  
@AntarrByrd With one difference: the exception handlers will be disabled in the else (while still being run before the ensure). – Chris Jester-Young Jul 28 '15 at 17:17
    
Cool thanks for the clarity. – Antarr Byrd Jul 28 '15 at 17:25

The else code will be executed if no exception was raised.

You can use a generic rescue (which defaults to StandardError) as you've mentioned in your last paragraph. To get all exceptions (also non-StandardError ones), you need to do rescue Exception.

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The else block in a begin rescue end block is used when you are perhaps expecting an exception of some sort to occur. If you run through all of your expected exceptions but still have nothing raised, then in your else block you can do whatever's needed now that you know that your original code ran error free.

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Here's a concrete use-case for else in a begin expression. Suppose you're writing automated tests, and you want to write a method that returns the error raised by a block. But you also want the test to fail if the block doesn't raise an error. You can do this:

def get_error_from(&block)
  begin
    block.call
  rescue => err
    err  # we want to return this
  else
    raise "No error was raised"
  end
end

Note that you can't move the raise inside the begin block, because it'll get rescued. Of course, there are other ways without using else, like checking whether err is nil after the end, but that's not as succinct.

Personally, I rarely use else in this way because I think it's rarely needed, but it does come in handy in those rare cases.

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