Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I set the gcc-compiler to only compile C-code? My main concern is, that I want to get a compiler error, if I try to use any C++ syntax, or even try to make use of the STL. Since I'm using Codeblocks it would be nice if you could point out how to change it there, but I'm sure I'd figure that bit out.

share|improve this question
    
Just had to realize that choosing "C" as the project language does the trick. However that would still leave the question if you can change this "manually", say you have accidentally chosen C++ for your project and now you want to change it to C. –  AudioDroid Jun 8 '11 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use the -std option, for example gcc -std=c89 says you want it to behave as if you are compiling C89 code. You will also probably want to use the -pedantic option, and give your files the .c extension, rather than .cpp. Also, gcc likes to allow its own extensions, which are not part of C or C++, and -pedantic will turn most of these off.

share|improve this answer
    
Why -pedantic ? He's trying to stay away from C++, not to follow the letter of the standard. –  cnicutar Jun 8 '11 at 15:07
    
@cnicular See my edit. And following the letter of the the standard is A Good Thing to do. –  nbt Jun 8 '11 at 15:10
    
@Neil Butterworth I think I see your point. Still, I like certain features of c99. –  cnicutar Jun 8 '11 at 15:15
    
@cnicular Fine! In that case use -std=c99. I was giving an example not saying that was what he must use! –  nbt Jun 8 '11 at 15:16
2  
Alternatively you could put -x c into the compiler options. That tells gcc that whatever you compile is a C file (without explicitly specifying a standard), even if it has a .cpp extension or no extension at all. –  Damon Jun 10 '11 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.