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I have a dataframe like this

Tag   Date (DD/MM/YYYY)
AA    1/1/2010
AB    2/1/2010
AC    3/1/2010
AA    4/1/2010
AB    5/1/2010
AA    6/1/2010
AB    7/1/2010
AC    8/1/2010

Now, there are finite amount of different tags, (less than 10 in average). What I need is to get the data in a more confortable way to deal with. I have already analized the Tag sequence data to find out the more frequently repeated patterns, in this case it would be (AA,AB,AC).

Now, what I'd like is to turn the data in something like this, so I can operate with it.

AA        AB        AC
1/1/2010  2/1/2010  3/1/2010
4/1/2010  5/1/2010  NA
6/1/2010  7/1/2010  8/1/2010

I've seen this question, Turning field values into column names in an R data frame, and it is quite close to what I need. Doing this

>libray(reshape2)
>df<-sqldf("SELECT Tag, Date FROM validData")
>head(dcast(df,Date~Tag))

yields

Using Date as value column: use value_var to override.
Aggregation function missing: defaulting to length

                Date  AF687A AVISOO B32D76 B3DC39 B52C72 DF7EAD DF8E83 DFA521 DFA91A
1 2010-12-23 09:18:50      0      0      0      0      1      0      0      0      0
2 2010-12-23 09:18:52      1      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0
3 2010-12-23 09:18:54      0      0      0      0      1      0      0      0      0
4 2010-12-23 09:18:57      1      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0
5 2010-12-23 09:18:58      0      0      0      0      1      0      0      0      0
6 2010-12-23 09:19:00      0      0      0      1      0      0      0      0      0

I think I'm close, but I can't figure out the last step, as in, compressing the table in what I described above. Any clues?

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1  
You do not explicitly mention this, but you assume a relation between the tags that follow one another (e.g.: when the 6th observation does not have tag AC, you use NA in your desired result). If you are content with: all dates where the tag is 'AA' and then all dates where the tag is 'AB' (etc.), even when the lengths of these are not the same, the task is a lot simpler. Can you confirm which of both you want? –  Nick Sabbe Jun 8 '11 at 15:51
    
Ideally I'd like the first choice, To make a new row when the pattern differs from a list. I know that making it in an imperative language or in something like PLSQL is easier than in R. But at the very least the second choice would be a start I guess. –  Manuel Ferreria Jun 8 '11 at 15:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd calculate the row and column you want to put Date in from the pattern in the Tag column and then just fill a new matrix.

First set the pattern you want to match for each row; I'll use the results from unique. This wouldn't work properly if the first set was missing a value (other than the last value).

pat <- unique(df$Tag)

Then calculate the column by matching the tag to the pattern, and the row by noticing when a new pattern starts.

col <- match(df$Tag, pat)
row <- cumsum(c(0,diff(col))<=0)

Then create the matrix and fill it up!

out <- matrix(nrow=max(row), ncol=max(col))
colnames(out) <- pat
out[cbind(row, col)] <- df$Date

The result is

> out
     AA         AB         AC        
[1,] "1/1/2010" "2/1/2010" "3/1/2010"
[2,] "4/1/2010" "5/1/2010" NA        
[3,] "6/1/2010" "7/1/2010" "8/1/2010"
share|improve this answer
    
Really nice solution, but, what is k in diff(k) ?, did you mean col? –  Manuel Ferreria Jun 8 '11 at 17:48
    
Yes, thanks. Fixed. –  Aaron Jun 8 '11 at 18:48
    
The way you solved it is really impressing, especially the cumsum(c(0,diff(col))<=0) and, consequently, out[cbind(row, col)] <- df$Date. I hope you get more points for that. –  Henrik Jun 8 '11 at 20:34
    
Thanks, Henrik. Matrix indexing isn't particularly well known, but can often provide a straightforward answer to problems like this. –  Aaron Jun 8 '11 at 20:42
    
+1 for the cumsum-fu –  Nick Sabbe Jun 9 '11 at 6:39

Although you describe a table in your question, it seems to me that you really want to make a list. You can do this using the split function:

split(df, df$Tag)

$AA
  Tag     Date
1  AA 1/1/2010
4  AA 4/1/2010
6  AA 6/1/2010

$AB
  Tag     Date
2  AB 2/1/2010
5  AB 5/1/2010
7  AB 7/1/2010

$AC
  Tag     Date
3  AC 3/1/2010
8  AC 8/1/2010

To get rid of the Tag column in each list, you can use lapply and split in combination:

lapply(split(df, df$Tag), function(x)x$Date[drop=TRUE])

$AA
[1] 1/1/2010 4/1/2010 6/1/2010
Levels: 1/1/2010 4/1/2010 6/1/2010

$AB
[1] 2/1/2010 5/1/2010 7/1/2010
Levels: 2/1/2010 5/1/2010 7/1/2010

$AC
[1] 3/1/2010 8/1/2010
Levels: 3/1/2010 8/1/2010
share|improve this answer
    
I understand your solution, but the table highlights the NA values, if it happens to appear. For now, it is a good starting point and I'll sure look into it. –  Manuel Ferreria Jun 8 '11 at 16:08

My answer uses a lot of nasty coding (i.e., two nested loops) to get to the desired solution, but it gives you exactly what you want:

df <- structure(list(Tag = c("AA", "AB", "AC", "AA", "AB", "AA", "AB", 
"AC"), Date = c("1/1/2010", "2/1/2010", "3/1/2010", "4/1/2010", 
"5/1/2010", "6/1/2010", "7/1/2010", "8/1/2010")), .Names = c("Tag", 
"Date"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -8L))

l <- nrow(df)
counter <- 1
cols <- c("AA", "AB", "AC")

fin <- data.frame(AA = NULL, AB = NULL, AC = NULL)
tmp <- data.frame(AA = NA, AB = NA, AC = NA)

while(counter < l) {
    tmp <- data.frame(AA = NA, AB = NA, AC = NA)
    for (col in 1:3) {
        if (df[counter,1] == cols[col]) {
            tmp[1,col] <- df[counter,2]
            counter <- counter + 1
        }
    }
    fin <- rbind(fin, tmp)
}

fin

gives you:

        AA       AB       AC
1 1/1/2010 2/1/2010 3/1/2010
2 4/1/2010 5/1/2010     <NA>
3 6/1/2010 7/1/2010 8/1/2010

Note that you could work with cols <- unique(sort(df[,1])) for a more general solution (for (col in 1:3) and the creation of fin and tmp would need to be changed accordingly).

Furthermore, this solution is not at all memory efficient or anything. You will get vast improvements if you preassign and so forth (on bigger data.frames), but for a quick and dirty way of doing it, it works.

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Excellent! I figured out that this would be the way to do it, just thought that there might be a hidden package in R that casting it with some arcane parameters would spit it out as I wanted it. But thanks! (I'll wait on the accepted solution to see if someone else comes up with a more R-ness way to do it) –  Manuel Ferreria Jun 8 '11 at 16:32

@Andrie was quite close to solution

# here assumed length 3
# but you can calculate it as max
do.call(cbind,lapply(split(mdf$Date,mdf$Tag),"[",seq(3)))


     AA         AB         AC        
[1,] "1/1/2010" "2/1/2010" "3/1/2010"
[2,] "4/1/2010" "5/1/2010" "8/1/2010"
[3,] "6/1/2010" "7/1/2010" NA        

EDIT (first solution didn't take into account pattern

mdf$grp <- cumsum(1*c(TRUE,diff(as.numeric(factor(mdf$Tag)))<=0))
reshape(mdf,direction="wide",idvar="grp",timevar="Tag")

  grp  Date.AA  Date.AB  Date.AC
1   1 1/1/2010 2/1/2010 3/1/2010
4   2 4/1/2010 5/1/2010     <NA>
6   3 6/1/2010 7/1/2010 8/1/2010
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