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I was wondering: is there a way to make Objective-C support a multi-variable switch construct?

I mean, very often I have to deal with problems in which the solution depends on a pair of variables instead of a single one. For a long list of single variable values one can use a simple switch/case construct:

switch (var) {
    case 0: ...
    case 1: ...
    default: ...
}

But when you have to deal with the combination of two values you often happen to do something like this:

switch (var1) {
    case 0: 
        switch (var2) {
            case 0: ...
            case 1: ...
        }
    case 1: 
        switch (var2) {
            case 0: ...
            case 1: ...
        }        
    ...
}

And it gets more and more complicated ... What I'd really love to do is something like this:

switch (var1, var2) {
    case (0,0) : ...
    case (1,0) : ...
    case (*,1) : ...
    default: ...
}

that will result in a more simple and readable construct. Is there any solution to support such a structure? Or a slight variation of this one?

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3  
+1 I would love to know which languages support such feature. –  Deepak Danduprolu Jun 8 '11 at 16:02
4  
These ones: stackoverflow.com/questions/5436983/… . But nothing about Objective-C I suppose. –  marzapower Jun 8 '11 at 16:03
    
Short answer is no. At best you could create a hash generator to switch on, but obj-c doesn't have functors, you'd still have to call something on your vars to use switch. Unless you go preprocessor macros, which seems like it wouldn't be worth the effort. Maybe an obj-c++ template solution using functors would work, but it would be pretty awkward and wouldn't save much time. Is there something wrong with calling methods inside of the first var's switch? =) –  slycrel Jun 16 '11 at 1:25
    
Does this thing need to be highly optimized? Would a list of else if statements be sufficent? Have you coded both and compared the two? –  Intentss Jun 16 '11 at 20:53
    
I do not really need something that is highly optimized. Just something that's easy to write and even more easy to mantain. A list of else if would not be the best solution, imho. But this should be a more generic question. I'd like a solution that best fits for everyone. –  marzapower Jun 17 '11 at 7:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+100

I like the answer from saphrosit but I'll make try to make it easy to understand.

Imagine the possible outcomes of your problem as squares in a grid where one edge of the edge of the grid represents values of var1 and the other edge represents the possible values of var2, then if you incrementialy counted through the squares of the of the grid you would it get something like this

      ||                              var1                                   |    
      ||    0    |     1     |     2     | ... |     j     | ... |   n-1     |
======++=====================================================================|
    0 ||    0    |     1     |     2     | ... |     j     | ... |   n-1     |
   ---||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------|
    1 ||    n    |    n+1    |    n+2    | ... |    n+j    | ... |  n+(n-1)  |
   ---||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------| 
    2 ||   2*n   |   2*n+1   |  2*n+2    | ... |   2*n+j   | ... | 2*n+(n-1) |
 v ---||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------|
 a    ||    .    |     .     |     .     |     |     .     |     |  .        |
 r ---||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------|
 2  i ||   i*n   |   i*n+1   |   i*n+2   | ... |   i*n+j   | ... | i*n+(n-1) |
   ---||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------|
      ||    .    |      .    |      .    |     |     .     |     |  .        |
  ----||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------|
  m-1 || (m-1)*n | (m-1)*n+1 | (m-1)*n+2 | ... | (m-1)*n+j | ... |   mn-1    | <-- (m-1)*n+(n-1) = m*n-n + (n-1) = mn-1
------||---------+-----------+-----------+-----+-----------+-----+-----------|

This would is called a row major matrix since you start by counting accross the rows. There is also a column major matrix where you start counting down first instead of across. This is how matrixes are stored in the C BLAS library so it should be very fimilar to many people.

In your case the outcome you're looking for can be addressed as var3 = var2*n + var1 you could lay this out in code as

#define N 10 // Maximum size of var1

int main() {

   int var1 = 1;
   int var2 = 1;

   switch(var1 + var2 * N){
      case 1 + 1 * N: printf("One One"); break;
      case 2 + 2 * N: printf("Two Two"); break;
      default:
      printf("Bada Bing");
   }

   return 0;
}

NOTE: the code that was here earlier wouldn't have worked, this works.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd say it's quite perfect. But it only works for positive values (could not be a great problem). Should you find a way to handle the case (n, *) case it would be perfect. Maybe passing some nil value to the custom function ... –  marzapower Jun 16 '11 at 5:15

In your question you mention: "What I'd really love to do is something like this:"

switch (var1, var2) {
    case (0,0) : ...
    case (1,0) : ...
    case (*,1) : ...
    default: ...
}

If it is the case that your possible values are in the range {0..n}, there are two methods you could use.

  1. You could construct a multidimensional array of selectors and then select the correct selector using your var1, var2. (This method is more efficient due to the constructing of the selectors at compile time)

  2. You could construct the selector name based on the values of the var,var2 variables.

BOTH methods are exemplified here in this code snippet.

- (void) case00 {
    NSLog(@"Case ZeroZero");
}

- (void) testSelectorIdea {
     NSInteger var1 = 0;
     NSInteger var2 = 0;

// ----- ARRAY OF SELECTORS METHOD ----
    SEL selectors[2][2] = {@selector(case00),@selector(case01), @selector(case10), @selector(case11)};
    [self performSelector:selectors[var1][var2]];


// ----- SELECTOR CONSTRUCTION METHOD ----
    NSString * selectorName = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"case%d%d",var1,var2];
    SEL  selector = NSSelectorFromString(selectorName);
    [self  performSelector:selector];

}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your answer, but this will require me to create a lot of different methods in my class, which I'd really not like to do. I am looking for a code-efficient and human-efficient method. Your solution will not work efficiently for the case (*,1) hypothesis, by the way. –  marzapower Jun 10 '11 at 13:44
    
Maybe you can use Blocks instead of selectors then, to avoid externalizing your code in other methods? –  AliSoftware Jun 17 '11 at 20:16

As others have said, if you find yourself wanting to do this, then you should really think about a way of structuring your data better. You seem like you're dealing with scalar types. I tend to find a little c++ goes a long way there, and you can integrate that into an objective-c project using objective-c++. That said, if you're sure you want what you say you want and you're not averse to evilness with the preprocessor, you could try something like this:

#define BEGIN_SWITCH(type,...) ({  typedef type T; T switchVars[] = { __VA_ARGS__ }; BOOL performAction;

#define CASE(...) { \
            T caseVars[] = { __VA_ARGS__ }; \
            performAction = YES; \
            size_t count = MIN(sizeof(switchVars), sizeof(caseVars)) / sizeof(T); \
            for (size_t i = 0 ; i < count / sizeof(T) ; i++) \
            { \
                if (caseVars[i] != switchVars[i]) \
                { \
                    performAction = NO; \
                    break; \
                } \
            } \
        } \
        if (performAction)

#define END_SWITCH });

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    id pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    int a1 = 0;
    int a2 = 5;
    int a3 = 10;

    BEGIN_SWITCH(int, a1, a2, a3)
        CASE(0,5) NSLog(@"0,5");
        CASE(1,2,3) NSLog(@"1,2,3");
        CASE(0,5,10) NSLog(@"0,5,10");
        CASE(1) NSLog(@"1");
    END_SWITCH

    [pool drain];

    return 0;
}

It isn't quite like switch/case, as you can't stack multiple case: clauses on top of oneanother. You'd have to add in default and break somehow in any case -- maybe you could do this with some extra macros and a goto for break. Standard caveats about the prepreocessor apply: It isn't pretty as Objective-C, and will be prone to giving you all kinds of unfathomable syntax errors. But if you really want to alter the syntax of the language, then your options are either something like this or getting a job with Apple.

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Not a solution, just a workaround: you may think to something like this

SInt32 var1, var2;
/*...*/
SInt64 var3 = var1<<32 + var2;

switch(var3) {
 .
 .
 .
}

if your vars have some particular property you may use it to do some slight simplifications, i.e. if vars are < 10 then you may use

 var3 = 10*var1+var2;
share|improve this answer
    
This way you will not able to handle properly all the possible cases, I mean first of all in a human-understandable way. Furthermore, you will not be able to write down quickly the corresponding test for the hypothetical case (0,*) : construct. And, last but not least, is quite ugly for me :D –  marzapower Jun 8 '11 at 22:03
    
I'm pretty sure you can handle all the possible cases (you may comment each case to make it clearer). I imagine you are talking about a general purpose construct, because actually (0,*) means var1 == 0, so there's no need to check var2, you may do something like if (var1==0) {} else { switch...}. But, of course, if you don't like it, there's very few I can do... :) –  Saphrosit Jun 8 '11 at 22:30
    
Well, I now that this is a common solution for that problem. I sometimes used something like this. What I'm looking for is something much more similar to a "pattern-based" switch construct (like for many functional languages). Thank you for trying! –  marzapower Jun 8 '11 at 22:38

Are you sure that this is a good programming style to have such constructions :) ? Switch statement is designed to speedup multiple if () else if () statements, but when you will need to compare multiple variables that optimization will go.

The one way is to use logical shifts/other operations to place multiple variables in one, and the other is to use if ((a == 0) & (b == 0)) {...} else if ((a == 0) && (b == 1)).... That wouldn't take a lot of space.

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Even using simple if structures instead of a switch wouldn't require that much more space, but switch is faster indeed. Instead of typing if ((a == 0) & (b == 0)) {...} I'd really rather write case (0,0):. Notice that the if construct is not "robust" against a change in the name of the variables, while the switch construct is. –  marzapower Jun 8 '11 at 21:57

Due to the existences of the ObjC-Runtime, it should be possible to build up a switch replacement with things like the selector type SEL/@selector()/performSelector, NSSelectorFromString, NSArrays/NSDictionaries and NSIndexPathes, that is way more powerful than the c-switch statement.
But it won't reside on language level, as this Python-code isn't as-well.

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The main problem here is that you can use blocks in Objective-C, but they are not supported by the older iPhone OS SDK, for example. It is fairly hard to build anonymous functions in Obj-C ... –  marzapower Jun 14 '11 at 17:29
    
you dont have to use blocks –  vikingosegundo Jun 14 '11 at 17:40
    
Well, I would not like to build an infinite set of different methods just to mimic a multi-variable switch construct. If that's the only solution, I'd better go on with the nested switches. –  marzapower Jun 14 '11 at 17:46
    
You can have a set of methods, that take an object, and save the methods names in nested array with NSIndexPathes with these objects. different indexPathes can reference to the same method, that will be performed with different objects. –  vikingosegundo Jun 14 '11 at 17:50
    
Yes, but I will have to create a method for each different case I'd use in the switch. I'd prefer to do this using blocks, because of the reduced overhead caused by the missing methods definition. But using blocks is not always supported. Btw, really thank you for the hints –  marzapower Jun 14 '11 at 18:52

How about something like:

switch ([NSString StringWithFormat: @"%d,%d", var1, var2]) {
    case (@"0,0") : ...
    case (@"1,0") : ...
    case (@"*,1") : ...
    default: ...
}

The problem would be *,1 but you could either spell those all out, or you could do a contains @",1" (I forget the right syntax atm)

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3  
switch/Case is not compatible with objects comparison and can only compare against atomic C types, so this solution can't be used. –  AliSoftware Jun 17 '11 at 20:11

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