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Here is very simplified version of code that i have:

class PrintJob : IEntity
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public string Departmen { get; set; }
    public int PagesPrinted { get; set; }
}

class PrintJobReportItem
{
    public int TotalPagesPrinted { get; set; }
    public int AveragePagesPrinted { get; set; }
    public int PercentOfSinglePagePrintJobs { get; set; }
}

class PrintJobByUserReportItem : PrintJobReportItem
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }
}

class PrintJobByDepartmenReportItem : PrintJobReportItem
{
    public string DepartmentName { get; set; }
    public int NumberOfUsers { get; set; }
}

Then i have 2 queries:

var repo = new Repository(...);

var q1 = repo.GetQuery<PrintJob>()
    .GroupBy(pj => pj.UserName)
    .Select(g => new PrintJobByUserReportItem
    {
    #region this is PrintJobReportItem properties
        TotalPagesPrinted = g.Sum(p => p.PagesPrinted),
        AveragePagesPrinted = g.Average(p => p.PagesPrinted),
        PercentOfSinglePagePrintJobs = g.Count(p => p.PagesPrinted == 1) / (g.Count(p => p.PagesPrinted) != 0 ? g.Count(p => p.PagesPrinted) : 1) * 100,
    #endregion    
        UserName = g.Key
    });

var q2 = repo.GetQuery<PrintJob>()
    .GroupBy(pj => pj.Departmen)
    .Select(g => new PrintJobByDepartmenReportItem
    {
    #region this is PrintJobReportItem properties
        TotalPagesPrinted = g.Sum(p => p.PagesPrinted),
        AveragePagesPrinted = g.Average(p => p.PagesPrinted),
        PercentOfSinglePagePrintJobs = g.Count(p => p.PagesPrinted == 1) / (g.Count(p => p.PagesPrinted) != 0 ? g.Count(p => p.PagesPrinted) : 1) * 100,
    #endregion    
        DepartmentName = g.Key,
        NumberOfUsers = g.Select(u => u.UserName).Distinct().Count()
    });

What would be suggestions for extracting parts where i assign values to TotalPagesPrinted, AveragePagesPrinted and PercentOfSinglePagePrintJobs out from those 2 queries, so that it can be reused and would follow DRY principle.

I'm using EF 4.1 code only approach and switching to another technology or approach is not an option. Also i cannot materialize that data, i need to keep it as query, because my grid component will add more things to query later, so i can't switch to Linq to Object.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would create a new class CLASSNAME that has two properties

  • PrintJobReportItem type
  • GROUPING IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey, TSource>>

Then create an extension method

public static IQueryable<CLASSNAME> EXTENSIONNAME<TKey, TSource>(this IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey, TSource>> source)
{
  return from g in source
         select new CLASSNAME
         {
           PrintJobReportItem = new PrintJobReportItem
                                {
                                  TotalPagesPrinted = g.Sum(p => p.PagesPrinted),
                                  AveragePagesPrinted = etc...,
                                  PercentOfSinglePagePrintJobs = etc...,
                                },
           GROUPING = g
         };
}

Then use like so, I haven't tested but I think it would work

var q1 = repo.GetQuery<PrintJob>()
    .GroupBy(pj => pj.UserName)
    .EXTENSIONNAME()
    .Select(g => new PrintJobByDepartmenReportItem
                 {
                    PrintJobReportItem = g.PrintJobReportItem,
                    DepartmentName = g.GROUPING.Key,
                    NumberOfUsers = g.GROUPING.Select(u => u.UserName).Distinct().Count()

                 });
share|improve this answer
    
If that would work then my ReportItems would have complex property types like PrintJobReportItem, and my grid component only deals with simple types. But your code gave me some ideas, i will try it out tomorrow at work. –  Andrej Slivko Jun 8 '11 at 18:44
    
this worked, what i did different is i derived CLASSNAME from PrintJobReportItem so i had to put only Group property there, but then of course i had to repeat all properties in select expression like TotalPagesPrinted = g.TotalPagesPrinted, AveragePagesPrinted = g.AveragePagesPrinted ... This is better then what i had, at least in c# code, but that creates 2 nested selects (with joins) in sql where before it was only one, so it's doing 2 transformations instead of one. –  Andrej Slivko Jun 9 '11 at 8:38
    
@qrow - I think your rdbms will be able to optimize the query and the performance will be the same –  Aducci Jun 9 '11 at 15:27
    
I'm accepting this answer for now, I didn't figure out better way to do it. Maybe in later versions of EF some other ways of reusing transformations will be supported. –  Andrej Slivko Jun 13 '11 at 6:11

The most straightforward thing I could think to do is create a PrintJobByDepartmenReportItem constructor that accepts a single IEnumerable<IGrouping<string, PrintJob>> parameter (which I believe should be the type of variable g in your sample). Keep in mind this also requires a parameter-less constructor definition, and your inherited classes would also need to implement a constructor prototype to call the base class constructor with the parameter:

Constructor

public PrintJobReportItem()
{
}

public PrintJobReportItem(IEnumerable<IGrouping<string, PrintJob>> g)
{
    this.TotalPagesPrinted = g.Sum(i => i.GetEnumerator().Current.PagesPrinted);
    this.AveragePagesPrinted = g.Average(i => i.GetEnumerator().Current.PagesPrinted);
    this.PercentOfSinglePagePrintJobs = g.Count(i => i.GetEnumerator().Current.PagesPrinted == 1) * 100 / g.Count(i => i.GetEnumerator().Current.PagesPrinted > 1);
}

Inherited Constructor

public PrintJobByDepartmentReportItem(IEnumerable<IGrouping<string, PrintJob>> g) : base(g)
{
    this.DepartmentName = g.First().Key;
    this.NumberOfUsers = g.Select(i => i.GetEnumerator().Current.UserName).Distinct().Count();
}

Queries

var q1 = repo.GetQuery<PrintJob>()
    .GroupBy(pj => pj.UserName)
    .Select(g => new PrintJobByUserReportItem(g));

var q2 = repo.GetQuery<PrintJob>()
    .GroupBy(pj => pj.Department)
    .Select(g => new PrintJobByDepartmentReportItem(g));

This does have the one downside of assuming you will always be grouping by a string member, but you could presumably GroupBy(i => i.MyProperty.ToString()) when appropriate or possibly change the prototype to accept IEnumerable<IGrouping<object, PrintJob>>.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the edit stream. My C# is rusty as hell. Tend to develop in VB.NET but the concepts are the same. :] –  lthibodeaux Jun 8 '11 at 18:57
    
In L2E you can only use a parameterless constructor –  Aducci Jun 8 '11 at 20:02
    
PrintJobReportItem doesn't look like an entity class to me... does that really rule it out here? –  lthibodeaux Jun 8 '11 at 21:52
    
PrintJob is the only entity here. All other classes is for view only –  Andrej Slivko Jun 9 '11 at 6:24
    
In that case, you should have no problems implementing the constructor-based solution. I didn't have any issues when building the project using the prototypes provided in the sample with my edits. Looks like it would clean up the code pretty handily as well. –  lthibodeaux Jun 9 '11 at 14:26

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