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I'm writing a program in C++ but using data from matlab involving Cross Correlation. I understand that when I do a correlation on 2 sets of data it gives me a single correlation coefficient number indicating if they are related. But I'm wanting to use Cross Correlation on the data series. When I run Cross Correlation on Matlab it gives me a lot of data and when plotted the plot looks like a triangle... I understand Correlation is supposed to be somewhere between +/- 1 but the data toward the tip of the triangle doesn't go up at the same time etc. Do I have a confusion with what Cross Correlation is giving me or is the data that Cross Correlation gives me actually correlation coefficients for each point s(t),p(t) for instance? Any help with clarifying is appreciated.

Edit 1 (after Phonon's Response)

My main question is: Is the data that I get when I cross correlate 2 data series the correlation coefficient for each point. For instance, (0,10) and (0,8); Is the data I'm getting the correlation coefficient of those 2 plots at x=0 ?

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How are you computing the correlation? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 8 '11 at 16:13
    
xcorr but my main question is Is the data that I get when I cross correlate 2 data series the correlation coefficient for each point. For instance, (0,10) and (0,8); Is the data I'm getting the correlation coefficient of those 2 plots at x=0 ? –  user772225 Jun 8 '11 at 16:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Matlab xcorr(x,x) gives auto-correlation of signal x. It is not scaled, it's simply a vector of inner products of the signal with shifted versions of itself. In order to scale it, use xcorr(x,x,'coeff'). This command will scale your auto-correlation by signal's energy (in other words it will divide each coefficient by value of coefficient at zero lag). Note that when you're doing cross-correlation, xcorr(x,y'coeff'), you will not get a value of 1 and zero lag, because the scaling is performed differently. It will only be 1 if you're correlating a signal with itself (I wish SO supported math formulas so that I could write it out for you).

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That makes sense but I need the cross correlation on 2 data sets not autocorrelation which is crosscorrelation on one data set and itself or whatever –  user772225 Jun 8 '11 at 16:23
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Use 'coeff', it will scale the data. All I was trying to say is that you will only get exactly 1 at zero lag if you correlate a signal with itself. –  Phonon Jun 8 '11 at 16:26
    
Phonon Do you understand my revised question above and does your answer still apply? –  user772225 Jun 8 '11 at 16:32
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I don't think I understand it well. It's practically indecipherable. –  Phonon Jun 8 '11 at 16:40
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Correlation coefficients do are not calculated for each point. They're calculated for each unit shift. –  Phonon Jun 8 '11 at 16:41

You probably want corrcoef, not xcorr.

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can you do a corrcoef for each point? –  user772225 Jun 8 '11 at 16:53
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@Tyler31: It is not clear what you mean. In general, a correlation coefficient is a single value for two sets of data, describing whether there's an underlying linear relationship between them. It's not clear what "doing a corrcoeff for each point" would mean. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 8 '11 at 17:00

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