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I am trying load a sparse array that I have previously saved. Saving the sparse array was easy enough. Trying to read it though is a pain. scipy.load returns a 0d array around my sparse array.

import scipy as sp
A = sp.load("my_array"); A
array(<325729x325729 sparse matrix of type '<type 'numpy.int8'>'
with 1497134 stored elements in Compressed Sparse Row format>, dtype=object)

In order to get a sparse matrix I have to flatten the 0d array, or use sp.asarray(A). This seems like a really hard way to do things. Is Scipy smart enough to understand that it has loaded a sparse array? Is there a better way to load a sparse array?

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1 Answer 1

The mmwrite/mmread functions in scipy.io can save/load sparse matrices in the Matrix Market format.

scipy.io.mmwrite('/tmp/my_array',x)
scipy.io.mmread('/tmp/my_array').tolil()    

mmwrite and mmread may be all you need. It is well-tested and uses a well-known format.

However, the following might be a bit faster:

We can save the the row and column coordinates and data as 1-d arrays in npz format.

import random
import scipy.sparse as sparse
import scipy.io
import numpy as np

def save_sparse_matrix(filename,x):
    x_coo=x.tocoo()
    row=x_coo.row
    col=x_coo.col
    data=x_coo.data
    shape=x_coo.shape
    np.savez(filename,row=row,col=col,data=data,shape=shape)

def load_sparse_matrix(filename):
    y=np.load(filename)
    z=sparse.coo_matrix((y['data'],(y['row'],y['col'])),shape=y['shape'])
    return z

N=20000
x = sparse.lil_matrix( (N,N) )
for i in xrange(N):
    x[random.randint(0,N-1),random.randint(0,N-1)]=random.randint(1,100)

save_sparse_matrix('/tmp/my_array',x)
load_sparse_matrix('/tmp/my_array.npz').tolil()

Here is some code which suggests saving the sparse matrix in an npz file may be quicker than using mmwrite/mmread:

def using_np_savez():    
    save_sparse_matrix('/tmp/my_array',x)
    return load_sparse_matrix('/tmp/my_array.npz').tolil()

def using_mm():
    scipy.io.mmwrite('/tmp/my_array',x)
    return scipy.io.mmread('/tmp/my_array').tolil()    

if __name__=='__main__':
    for func in (using_np_savez,using_mm):
        y=func()
        print(repr(y))
        assert(x.shape==y.shape)
        assert(x.dtype==y.dtype)
        assert(x.__class__==y.__class__)    
        assert(np.allclose(x.todense(),y.todense()))

yields

% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_mm()'
10 loops, best of 3: 380 msec per loop

% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_np_savez()'
10 loops, best of 3: 116 msec per loop
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1  
+1, scipy.io is the proper solution. I would add that if you want to go down the optimization road, you might consider numpy.load(mmap_mode='r'/'c'). Memory-mapping the files from disk gives instant load and can save memory, as the same memory-mapped array can be shared across multiple processes. –  Radim Jul 19 '11 at 21:07
    
scipy.io.savemat is probably the best –  mathtick Mar 27 '13 at 15:11
    
Using np_savez instead of mm decreased my loading time of a big sparse matrix from 8min47 to 3s ! Thanks ! I also tried savez_compressed but the size is the same and the loading time much longer. –  oao Mar 1 at 2:38

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