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An easy one no doubt for you...

I have a list of filenames which are like so;

fw_d.log.1.gz  
through  
fw_d.log.300.gz  

When i use this below code block, it almost sorts it the way i want, but not quite.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
my $basedir = "/var/log";
my @verdir = qw(fw_d);
my $fulldir;
my $configs;
my $combidir;

foreach $combidir (@verdir) {
    $fulldir = "$basedir/$combidir";
    opendir (DIR, $fulldir);
    my @files = grep { $_ ne '.' && $_ ne '..' && $_ ne 'CVS' readdir DIR;
    closedir (DIR);
    @files1 = sort {$a cmp $b}(@files);
    foreach my $configs (@files1) {
        print "Checking $configs\n";
        system("less $basedir/$combidir/$configs | grep \'.* Group = , Username = .* autheauthenticated.\' >> output.log" );
    }
}

here is a snippet output

Checking fw_d.log  
Checking fw_d.log.1.gz  
Checking fw_d.log.10.gz  
Checking fw_d.log.100.gz  
Checking fw_d.log.101.gz  
Checking fw_d.log.102.gz  

As you can see, it almost sorts it how i was hoping.... Does anyone have any suggestions, on either reading, or a code snippet i can use?

Thanks in advance.
Steve.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the problem? I see that the files are in order. How would you want them sorted? –  Qtax Jun 8 '11 at 17:24
    
@qtax, they are indeed in order, but not numerical order, as i have files from 1-300 they should go 1,2.3 not 1 100 101 –  Steve Jun 9 '11 at 8:11
    
oh, thought you just omitted those lines for some reason. You should use <=> to sort on the number values, like M42's answer. –  Qtax Jun 9 '11 at 8:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You could use Schartzian-transform :

my @sorted = map  { $_->[0] }
             sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] }
             map  { [$_, $_=~/(\d+)/] }
                 @files;
print Dumper \@sorted;

Added benchmark for comparison between Schwartzian-Transform and subroutine

use Benchmark qw(:all);

# build list of files
my @files = map {'fw_d.log.'.int(rand()*1000).'.log' } 0 ..300;

my $count = -3;
my $r = cmpthese($count, {
        'subname' => sub {
              sub expand {
                   my $file=shift; 
                   $file=~s{(\d+)}{sprintf "%04d", $1}eg;
                   return $file;
              }
              my @sorted = sort { expand($a) cmp expand($b) } @files;
        },
        'schwartzian' => sub {
              my @sorted = map  { $_->[0] }
                           sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] }
                           map  { [$_, $_=~/(\d+)/] }
                 @files;
         }
});

Result:

              Rate     subname schwartzian
subname     21.2/s          --        -92%
schwartzian  279/s       1215%          --

Schwartzian-transform is about 13 times more efficient for sorting 300 files.

share|improve this answer
    
This also works, thanks. –  Steve Jun 9 '11 at 8:17
    
@Steve: You're welcome. I have added benchmark. –  Toto Jun 9 '11 at 13:27
    
While we're nitpicking... I don't think the bench is actually representative of the data: the real order would be the alphabetical order initially mentioned by the OP, generated with my @files = sort map {"fw_d.log.$_.log" } 0 ..300; –  mirod Jun 9 '11 at 17:13
    
running the benchmark with the proper data, the Schwartzian transform "only" speed it up 8x –  mirod Jun 9 '11 at 17:27
    
time to implement i think.... –  Steve Jun 10 '11 at 10:03

the problem is that the code does what you tell it to do: sort the file names in alphabetical order.

You should replace sort { $a cmp $b } by sort { expand($a) cmp expand($b) }

with expand:

sub expand 
   { my $file=shift; 
     $file=~s{(\d+)}{sprintf "%04d", $1}eg; # expand all numbers to 4 digits
     return $file;
   }
share|improve this answer
    
While the "g" increases the flexibility, I don't believe that the "e" (expression evaluation) is necessary. –  Ekkehard.Horner Jun 8 '11 at 18:01
1  
@Ekkehard.Horner the e allows the sprintf to be evaluated, without it the code doesn't work (I should know, I forgot it the first time I tried it!) –  mirod Jun 8 '11 at 19:57
    
@mirod: you are right; my apologies for my blunder. –  Ekkehard.Horner Jun 8 '11 at 21:00
    
Wonderful works exactly. thank you so much. –  Steve Jun 9 '11 at 8:17
1  
NB: That only works on integers; when you have decimal numbers like 1.1 and 1.02 and 1.201 and such, it gets things wrong. Signed numbers will also be a problem. I do have code that does the right thing for these, but it’s too big to fit into the comment. :) You can find a rather elaborate prototype here, although it does several other things, too, like normalization Roman numerals and Greek letternames written in Latin script. –  tchrist Jun 9 '11 at 16:50

What you can try is using a custom sort function:

sub sort_by_number {
    $a =~ /(\d+)/;
    $numa = $1;
    $b =~ /(\d+)/;
    $numb = $1;

    return $numa <=> $numb;
}

and then sort like this:

@files1 = sort sort_by_number @files;

This will sort the strings in @files by the value of the first number in each string.

share|improve this answer
2  
The pattern "/ ( \ d + \ )" should be changed to "/(\d+)" –  Ekkehard.Horner Jun 8 '11 at 17:45
    
@Ekkehard: thanks! It's a habit from vim... –  Nathan Fellman Jun 8 '11 at 17:50
    
they should make vim a comment/post editor here on SO. ;) flash vim? –  TLP Jun 9 '11 at 6:02
    
As does this once i corrected the pattern... thanks again. –  Steve Jun 9 '11 at 8:17

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