Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing ScalaTest FeatureSpec's for a Wicket app. I have a wicketTester value, that I keep on having to call methods on, viz:

scenario("No username and password") {
  val wicketTester = new WicketTester(app)
  given("user visits Admin home page")
  wicketTester.startPage(classOf[AdminHomePage])

  then("signin page is displayed")
  val login = wicketTester.newFormTester("signInPanel:signInForm")
  wicketTester.assertRenderedPage(classOf[SignInPage])
  ...
  when("correct username and password are entered")
  ...
  then("no login and error is displayed")
  wicketTester.assertRenderedPage(classOf[SignInPage])
  wicketTester.assertErrorMessages(Array("Field 'password' is required."))

Now all these refs to wicketTester are getting me down, so I want to remove them, aiming for DSL nirvana...

scenario("No username and password") {
  val wicketTester = new WicketTester(app)
  given("user visits Admin home page")
  startPage(classOf[AdminHomePage])

  then("signin page is displayed")
  val login = wicketTester.newFormTester("signInPanel:signInForm")
  assertRenderedPage(classOf[SignInPage])...

Is there any way to make the methods on a local appear as if they are methods on my class?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Did you try an import?

scenario("No username and password") {
   val wicketTester = new WicketTester(app)
   import wicketTester._    // import wicketTester's members into scope
   given("user visits Admin home page")
   startPage(classOf[AdminHomePage])

   then("signin page is displayed")
   val login = wicketTester.newFormTester("signInPanel:signInForm")
   assertRenderedPage(classOf[SignInPage])...  
}
share|improve this answer
    
You beauty! I'd seen that done somewhere recently and thought that it would come in handy, but obviously reading isn't enough to internalize - I actually have to bang my head against the compiler! –  Duncan McGregor Jun 8 '11 at 18:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.