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I was recently talking with a buddy about return values taking only a single meaning. At my previous job, we worked with C++ and had typedef'ed wBOOL so that a 0 was wFALSE, and 1 was wTRUE. The architect said that we can also return 2, 3, 4... for more information, which I think is a horrible idea. If we expect wTRUE = 1 and wFALSE = 0 and wBOOL = {wTRUE, wFALSE}, returning anything else should be avoided... now, on to today's C#.

I recently reviewed a piece of code where there were a collection of functions that determined if there was an error and returned the string back to the user:

private bool IsTestReady(out string errorMessage)
{
  bool isReady = true;
  errorMessage = string.Empty;
  if(FailureCondition1)
  {
    isReady = false;
    errorMessage = FailureMessage1;
  }
  else if(FailureCondition2)
  {
    isReady = false;
    errorMessage = FailureMessage2;
  }
  //... other conditions
  return isReady;
}

Then, to use these functions...

private enum Tests
{ TestA, TestB, TestC }
private void UpdateUI()
{
  string error = string.Empty;
  bool isTestReady;
  switch(this.runningTest) // which test are we running (TestA, TestB, or TestC)
  {
    case Tests.TestA:
      isTestReady = IsTestAReady(error);
      break;
    case Tests.TestB:
      isTestReady = IsTestBReady(error);
      break;
    case Tests.TestC:
      isTestReady = IsTestCReady(error);
      break;
  }
  runTestButton.Enabled = isTestReady;
  runTestLabel.Text = error;
}

I thought to separate these out into two methods:

private string GetTestAErrorMessage()
{
  //same as IsTestReady, but only returns the error string, no boolean stuffs
}

private bool IsTestAReady
{
  get{ return string.IsNullOrEmpty(GetTestAErrorMessage()); }
}

Does this violate the principal of not having a return value mean more than one thing? For instance, in this case, if there error message IsNullOrEmpty, then there is no error. I think that this does not violate that principal; my co-worked does. To me, it's no different than this:

class Person
{
  public int Height {get;}
  public bool IsTall() { return Height > 10; }
}

Any thoughts or suggestions on a different approach to this issue? I think the out parameter is the worst of the solutions.

share|improve this question
    
BTW, I did not add that last bit about the Person class and it is not the same to me. In this case, the existence of a height does not imply Born-ness; but the existence of an error message does imply the existence of an error. –  MPavlak Aug 27 '12 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not a big fan of having the null or empty return value indicate that nothing is wrong. A better comparison than the one you gave is:

class Person
{
    public int Height {get;}
    public bool IsBorn() { return Height > 0; }
}

In .NET, it is common practice to use the "bool return with out parameter" pattern you see in your original method (see the various TryParse methods, for example). However, if you prefer, another solution would be to create a TestReadyCheck class with both the boolean and the string as properties. I've done something similar with the following class, and been quite happy with it.

public class RequestFilterResult
{
    public static readonly RequestFilterResult Allow = new RequestFilterResult(true, null);
    public static RequestFilterResult Deny(string reason) { return new RequestFilterResult(false, reason); }
    protected RequestFilterResult(bool allowRequest, string denialReason)
    {
        AllowRequest = allowRequest;
        DenialReason = denialReason;
    }

    public bool AllowRequest { get; private set; }
    public string DenialReason { get; private set; }
}

This allows for the following usage:

public RequestFilterResult Filter(...)
{
    if (FailureCondition1) return RequestFilterResult.Deny(FailureMessage1);
    if (FailureCondition2) return RequestFilterResult.Deny(FailureMessage2);
    return RequestFilterResult.Allow();
}

It's concise, while enforcing that failure results provide a failure message, and success results don't.

On a side note, the structure of your switch statement feels like a code smell to me. You may want to consider ways to leverage polymorphism. Maybe make each test have its own class, with an IsTestReady method on it?

share|improve this answer
    
"In .NET, it is common practice to use the 'bool return with out parameter' pattern you see" -- Is this really the case? I thought that the TryParse, etc were convenient methods because they throw. If the alternate method (Parse) did not throw, there would be no reason for the TryParse -- that was my understanding at least. –  MPavlak Jun 9 '11 at 13:54
    
Thanks so much, I really like your idea here with the public static methods pre-packaging the Deny and Allow versions of the result. I also agree that the code smells -- thanks for the help!! –  MPavlak Jun 9 '11 at 13:57
    
@user652688: Regarding TryParse, there are cases where you expect the string to be valid, so you would rather have an exception thrown if your expectations are not met, but there are other cases where you expect that the string might not be valid, and would rather check and perform the parse in one operation (since it's largely the same logic--no point doing it twice). By returning a bool, the method lends itself well to if(int.TryParse(...)) {} structures. Your code doesn't use this structure, but with a good refactoring it could. (e.g., you could avoid setting the error label on success) –  StriplingWarrior Jun 9 '11 at 14:57
    
... so I guess my point is that it is common practice to use this pattern in places where failure is part of your expected logic flow. On the other hand, it is best to avoid this pattern when throwing an exception makes more sense. –  StriplingWarrior Jun 9 '11 at 15:01

The return value and the error message are technically not bound together. You could have a developer come along at a later time and add a new failure condition to IsTestReady, and that failure condition may not set an error message. Or, perhaps there is a message, but it doesn't exactly represent a failure (like, perhaps a warning or something), so the error message parameter may get set, but the return value is true.

An exception doesn't really work in this case either, for the exact reason that StriplingWarrior wrote in his comment - exceptions should be used for non-normal operational states, and a non-ready test is a normal state.

One solution might be to remove the error message parameter and have the IsTestReady function return a class:

public class TestReadyResult {
    public bool IsReady { get; set; }
    public string Error { get; set; }
}

There is just one property to check - TestReadyResult.IsReady - for test state, and if necessary, the Error property can be used for non-ready states. There is no extra parameter to manage for the function call, either.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I wonder why I have an aversion to creating return types like this, but I do agree that it is likely the most appropriate solution. –  MPavlak Jun 9 '11 at 13:55

I would use exceptions to convey information about failure states, rather than relying on the caller to know how to use an error message field (even though it's private).

share|improve this answer
    
If it's truly an exception state, I would agree. In this case, it looks more like an expected situation for the tests not to be ready to run yet. –  StriplingWarrior Jun 8 '11 at 18:52
    
I agree, since this is not an exceptional case that exceptions would not be appropriate. –  MPavlak Jun 9 '11 at 13:54

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