Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a command (in Linux Bash) that I want to prevent myself from ever running with a specific option. However, I want to still run that command with other options. So for example the following are OK:

command opt1
command opt2

But I want to disable

command badopt

I was thinking of doing this by aliasing it to a nonexistant command in my profile, like

alias "command badopt"=djskagldjkgldasg

but this doesn't seem to work. Any other suggestions for (easily) disabling my ability to use this specific option while preserving my ability to use other options?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

$ cat >> $HOME/.bashrc
shutdown () {
  if [ "x$1" = x-h ]; then
    echo Please do not run shutdown with the -h option.
    return
  fi
  /sbin/shutdown "$@"
}

# updated

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is a cool idea. However, when I try to do this, it actually immediately terminates my Bash session, like it is exiting out. This happens whether I use the "good" option or the "bad" option, and even if I get rid of the exit 1 line. –  Stephen Jun 8 '11 at 19:07
    
Oh right, that's a bug. I was about to test it when I got a phone call. Just change: exit 1 to return and get rid of the exec –  DigitalRoss Jun 8 '11 at 19:18
    
Wouldn't return 1 be more useful here? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 9 '11 at 2:11

bash functions are what you want. Assuming the command you want to intercept is named "foo":

foo () {
    case "$1" in 
        badopt) 
            echo "do not push this button again" >&2
            return 1
            ;;
    esac
    command foo "$@"
}

The keyword command is used to prevent the function from calling itself recursively.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.