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I'm learning Linq-to-Sql, and I'm encountering the scenario where I'm trying to build a dynamic query with sorting, filtering, and paging.

If I run a query like this I am able to get "paged" results:

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query = (_dataContext.WorkOrders).Skip((search.page - 1) * search.rows).Take(search.rows);
var retval = query.ToList();

in this case the generated query looks like this:

SELECT <columns>
FROM (
    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (<columns>) AS [ROW_NUMBER], <columns>
    FROM [dbo].[WorkOrders] AS [t0]
    ) AS [t1]
WHERE [t1].[ROW_NUMBER] BETWEEN @p0 + 1 AND @p0 + @p1
ORDER BY [t1].[ROW_NUMBER]

However if I run the query like this, it is no longer paged:

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query = (_dataContext.WorkOrders);
query.Skip((search.page - 1) * search.rows).Take(search.rows);
var retval = query.ToList();

In this case, the generated query looks like this:

SELECT <cut for brevity>
FROM [dbo].[WorkOrders] AS [t0]

I can't really grok what is going here... exactly when does Linq to Sql generate the query, and is it possible to add extra criteria like Skip, Take, OrderBy to an existing IQueryable? Where I'd like to end up would be something like this:

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query = (_dataContext.WorkOrders);
if (User.IsNotAuthorizedToSeeSomething) {
    query.Where(...);
}
if (search.sortField.Equals("Name")) {
    query.OrderBy(...);
}
query.Skip((search.page - 1) * search.rows).Take(search.rows);
var retval = query.ToList();
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried stepping through the code with the SQL Profiler running. Can you see at what line the SQL is actually sent to the database? Perhaps that can help answer your question. –  Colin Mackay Jun 8 '11 at 19:40
    
I used the SQL profiler to retrieve the generated queries shown above; turns out that the problem was that I didn't realize that each Linq method call actually returns a new IQueryable instance. –  BCG Jun 9 '11 at 11:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query = (_dataContext.WorkOrders);
query.Skip((search.page - 1) * search.rows).Take(search.rows);
var retval = query.ToList();

try

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query = (_dataContext.WorkOrders);
query = query.Skip((search.page - 1) * search.rows).Take(search.rows);
var retval = query.ToList();

each query.Xxx() is not applying Xxx on query object but returns new object.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's the crucial missing piece - you're not assigning the result of the Skip to anything, so it doesn't modify the query. –  GalacticCowboy Jun 8 '11 at 19:48
1  
To the rest of your question, you can absolutely do what you want, you just have to continue following the same pattern that qrow showed here. query = query.Where(...) inside your if statements. –  GalacticCowboy Jun 8 '11 at 19:51
    
Ok, I get it now. I guess I was thinking that the extension methods all just modified the same IQueryable instance, but it looks like they actually return a new IQueryable for each method invocation. This answer absolutely solves my problem. Thanks! –  BCG Jun 8 '11 at 19:51
    
If you chain them together, it hides this complexity from you, which is why you were confused. :) –  GalacticCowboy Jun 8 '11 at 19:53

It appears that in the second case it is going ahead and executing the query against the database when the first line executes. The Skip and Take are then executed as LINQ to Objects rather than LINQ to SQL.

I'm not really sure why it would do that though...

Do the values of retval look the same in both cases. (It should if what I think is happening really is happening.)

share|improve this answer
    
The return values do not look the same... in the second case I am getting the results of the generated query. –  BCG Jun 8 '11 at 19:48
    
I guess I should have looked closer at the comments. I just noticed the problem was that you were not assigning the results. I've done that quite a few times myself. –  Jeff Machamer Jun 8 '11 at 20:38

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