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For example, i have next code:

#include <set>
using namespace std;

struct SomeStruct 
{
    int a;
};

int main ()
{
    set<SomeStruct *> *some_cont = new set<SomeStruct *>;
    set<SomeStruct *>::iterator it;
    SomeStruct *tmp;

    for (int i = 0 ; i < 1000; i ++)
    {
        tmp = new SomeStruct;
        tmp->a = i;
        some_cont->insert(tmp);
    }

    for (it = some_cont->begin(); it != some_cont->end(); it ++)
    {
        delete (*it);
    }

    some_cont->clear(); // <<<<THIS LINE
    delete some_cont;
    return 0;
}

Does "THIS LINE" need to be called before deleting some_cont for avoiding memory leaks or destructor will be called automatically?

share|improve this question
    
By the way, your typedef should not have () –  Kiril Kirov Jun 8 '11 at 19:42
    
You should be aware that what you have here is some old school C style code, and not at all the right way to write that in C++. –  Rob K Jun 8 '11 at 19:53

5 Answers 5

You don't need to call it, destructor will be called for sure.

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No, there is no need to clear the set before destroying it.

Note that there is very rarely a need to allocate an std::set (or any standard container) manually. You'd be much better off just putting it in automatic storage and letting C++ handle the cleanup for you:

So instead of

set<SomeStruct *> *some_cont = new set<SomeStruct *>;

use

set<SomeStruct *> some_cont;

then change all some_cont-> to some_cont. and remove the delete some_cont (the container will be destroyed when main exits automatically.

The advantage to do things this way are:

  1. You don't need to remember to delete the container, and
  2. You don't need to do an expensive memory allocation up front.

It's also far more idomatic C++ to put things in automatic storage.

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No, you don't need to explicitly clear a set before destroying the set.

OTOH, you do have a number of other problems ranging from lousy (Java-like) design, to incorrect syntax, to a missing operator to lots of potential memory leaks. While some of the design might make sense in Java or C#, it's a really poor idea in C++. Once we get rid of the most egregious problems, what we have left is something like this:

#include <set>

struct SomeStruct 
{
    int a;
    SomeStruct(int i) : a(i) {}
    bool operator<(SomeStruct const &other) const { return a < other.a; }
};

int main ()
{
    std::set<SomeStruct> some_cont;

    for (int i = 0 ; i < 1000; i ++)
    {
        SomeStruct tmp(i);
        some_cont.insert(tmp);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would even avoid using tmp (: –  Kiril Kirov Jun 8 '11 at 19:59
    
@Kiril: I probably would too -- but I was trying to retain as much of the original as possible while still being at least halfway reasonable. The other changes are (IMO) essential; that one would be desirable but optional. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 8 '11 at 20:03
    
Yes, but lifetime of my objects are starting and ending in different functions, so i need to use allocation and deallocation. –  Oleg Jun 8 '11 at 20:07
1  
@Oleg: not really. When you insert something into a set, it gets copied into the set, and the set then owns the (copy of) the object. It will then have the lifetime of the set unless you delete it from the set first. Objects stored in a set need to be comparable. If you don't care about ordering (or at least uniqueness, which still depends on comparisons), you may want some other container. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 8 '11 at 20:17
1  
It sounds a bit like func1 and func2 might make sense as members of the same class, with the set (or vector) as a member of the same class so the container and its contents exist for the life of the parent object. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 8 '11 at 20:28

No it is not, this will be done automatically in the set's destructor.

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The STL containers automatically free any memory they own. So in your case the place allocated to store your SomeStruct* will be freed by the destructor of set. Note that the destructor of set does not call any destructors of SomeStruct, so it's good you iterate over them to delete them yourself.

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You're wrong - calling destructor of set will call the destructors of all SomeStruct, if they are allocated on the stack. The need to explicitly delete all allocated SomeStruct objects has nothing to do with set's destructor. –  Kiril Kirov Jun 8 '11 at 19:48
    
@Kiril: But they aren't allocated on the stack. They are allocated using new in that 1000 iteration for loop. In that example, all those SomeStructs will not be freed. –  Peter Alexander Jun 8 '11 at 19:53
    
@Peter - yes, you're right and I don't say something else. I'm saying, that @danta is wrong about "Note that the destructor of set does not call any destructors of SomeStruct" - free-ing memory, allocated on the heap, has nothing to do with set's destructor in this case, right? –  Kiril Kirov Jun 8 '11 at 19:55
    
@Kiril: What @danta said is correct. –  Peter Alexander Jun 8 '11 at 19:57
    
if I remember good, boost has some containers that take ownership. So if you insert a SomeStruct pointer, it will take care of deleting it. I just wanted to mention that the stl containers do no such thing. –  danta Jun 8 '11 at 19:59

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