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Say I have this code:

private void CreateSnapshots(IEnumerable<StreamHead> streams)
{
    foreach (StreamHead head in streams)
    {
        IAggregate aggregate = ???;
        IMemento memento = aggregate.GetSnapshot();

        var snapshot = new Snapshot(head.StreamId, head.SnapshotRevision + 1, memento);

        eventStore.AddSnapshot(snapshot);

        observer.Notify(new SnapshotTaken(head.StreamId, head.HeadRevision));
    }
}

how do I know what aggregate to load for the current stream? I'm also using CommonDomain. Is there something in there?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Just noticed that OptimisticEventStore.OpenStream(Guid streamId, int minRevision, int maxRevision) doesn't do anything with the commit headers. Is this where the problem lies? –  Chris Martin Jun 8 '11 at 20:53
    
-> PopulateStream(int minRevision, int maxRevision, IEnumerable<Commit> commits) –  Chris Martin Jun 8 '11 at 20:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The snapshotting aspect of the EventStore needs a bit of love. I have tried to make the IStoreEvents interface geared toward working with an individual aggregate. I have also tried to ensure that snapshotting does not interfere or get in the way of normal use.

Since the release of v2.0, I have now turned my attention toward v2.1 and I will be able to make a few small API changes related to this. In the meantime, your best option is probably to bypass IStoreEvents altogether when doing snapshotting.

Another alternative is to have the snapshotting code run in-process with your regular code. When an aggregate is loaded the needs a snapshot, you could easily push a reference to that aggregate asynchronously to your snapshotting code. In this way, you don't actually have to do a load because you already have the aggregate.

share|improve this answer

I found a solution for me (this is most definitely a hack). It is still out-of-band snapshotting. Here's a sample of it in action.

private void CreateSnapshots(IEnumerable<StreamHead> streams)
{
    foreach (StreamHead head in streams)
    {
        //NOTE: This uses a patched version of EventStore that loads commit headers in OptimisticEventStream.PopulateStream()
        // <code>
        // this.identifiers.Add(commit.CommitId);
        // this.headers = this.headers.Union(commit.Headers).ToDictionary(k => k.Key, k => k.Value);
        // </code>
        var stream = eventStore.OpenStream(head.StreamId, int.MinValue, int.MaxValue);

        //NOTE: Nasty hack but it works.
        var aggregateType = stream.UncommittedHeaders.Where(p=>p.Key=="AggregateType").First();
        var type = aggregateTypeResolver(aggregateType.Value.ToString());

        MethodInfo methodInfo = typeof(IRepository).GetMethod("GetById");
        MethodInfo method = methodInfo.MakeGenericMethod(type);

        object o = method.Invoke(repository, new object[]{head.StreamId, head.HeadRevision});
        var aggregate = (IAggregate) o;

        IMemento memento = aggregate.GetSnapshot();

        var snapshot = new Snapshot(head.StreamId, head.HeadRevision, memento);

        eventStore.AddSnapshot(snapshot);

        observer.Notify(new SnapshotTaken(head.StreamId, head.HeadRevision));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This most recent commit (github.com/joliver/EventStore/commit/…) exposes the underlying persistence directly. This allows better access the actual commits themselves. Further, you'll probably want to delegate the construction of an aggregate to some kind of factory class instead of doing all of that crazy reflection. –  Jonathan Oliver Jun 10 '11 at 12:00
    
I'll give it a shot but, by first glance, I still don't see a way to find the type of aggregate to load from the stream. –  Chris Martin Jun 13 '11 at 21:35
    
If you're using the CommonDomain project, the type will be stored on each commit in the headers. Because you'll have access to the raw commit, you can access the headers and get the type. –  Jonathan Oliver Jun 15 '11 at 20:36

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