Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing a Google Data Source using their Python Library. I would like the response from the library to be able to be imported in another Python script using the simplejson library.

However, even their example doesn't validate in JSONLint:

{cols: 
    [{id:'name',label:'Name',type:'string'},
     {id:'salary',label:'Salary',type:'number'},
     {id:'full_time',label:'Full Time Employee',type:'boolean'}],
rows: 
    [{c:[{v:'Jim'},{v:800,f:'$800'},{v:false}]},
     {c:[{v:'Bob'},{v:7000,f:'$7,000'},{v:true}]},
     {c:[{v:'Mike'},{v:10000,f:'$10,000'},{v:true}]},
     {c:[{v:'Alice'},{v:12500,f:'$12,500'},{v:true}]}]}

How do I tweak the simplejson 'loads' function to import the above JSON? I think the main problem is that the object keys are not strings.

I would rather not write a regex to convert the keys to strings since I think such code would be annoying to maintain.

I am currently getting an "Expecting property name: line 1 column 1 (char 1)" error when trying to import the above json into python with simplejson.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It is considered to be invalid JSON without the string keys.

{id:'name',label:'Name',type:'string'}

must be:

{'id':'name','label':'Name','type':'string'}

According to the Google Data Source page, they're returning invalid JSON. They don't specifically say it, but all their examples lack quotes on the keys.

Here is a fairly complete list of JSON processors for Python which goes into detail about what formats they support, and how well. Most don't support non-string keys, but it appears that demjson will convert it.

easy_install demjson
share|improve this answer
1  
JSON expects strings as keys, not python dictionaries e.g., {1:1, 2:4} is a valid python dictionary but it is an invalid JSON. {id:1} and {"id":1} is a valid Javascript. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 10 '09 at 15:09
    
To be clear, I meant that the example shown is not a valid python dictionary. Index numbers are legal, but any names must be strings. {id:1} is valid Javascript but invalid Python. –  Soviut Mar 10 '09 at 18:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.