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I have a fairly detailed question about the right way to wrap a checked exception, and the way that Guava does it. (Apologies for the length but I want to get my thought process down)


The standard Runnable interface looks like this:

public interface Runnable
{
   public void run();
}

where run() can't throw a checked exception.

So if I want to have a Runnable which is used to wrap tasks which throw checked exceptions, and I intend to have the thing that calls Runnable.run() handle those exceptions, rather than in Runnable.run() itself, I have to wrap the exception in an unchecked exception.

So for a while I was using:

Runnable r = new Runnable {
   @Override public void run()
   {
       try {
          doNastyStuff();
       }
       catch (NastyException e)
       {
          throw new RuntimeException(e);
       }
   }      
};

and then I can handle RuntimeException in an upper level. Except then I figured, that what I really want is to handle a wrapped exception separately, since I know its semantics are to wrap a checked exception, so I wrote this helper class:

/**
 * Wrapped exception: the purpose of this is just to wrap another exception,
 * and indicate that it is a wrapped exception
 */
public class WrappedException extends RuntimeException
{
    /**
     * @param t any throwable
     */
    public WrappedException(Throwable t)
    {
        super(t);
    }
}

and then I can do this:

/* place that produces the exception */
...
catch (NastyException e)
{
   throw new WrappedException(e);
}

...
/* upper level code that calls Runnable.run() */
try
{
   ...
   SomeOtherNastyCode();
   r.run();
   ...
}
catch (SomeOtherNastyException e)
{
   logError(e);
}
catch (WrappedException e)
{
   logError(e.getCause());
}

and it seems to work great.

But now I'm thinking, well, if I want to use this in a library as well as an application that uses the library, now they both depend on WrappedException, so it should really be in a base library that I can include everywhere.

Which makes me think, maybe Guava has a standard WrappedException class somewhere, since I now include Guava as a dependency by default. So I can just do

throw new WrappedException(e);

or

throw Exceptions.wrap(e);

or

Exceptions.rethrow(e);

I just looked around in Guava and found Throwables which has Throwables.propagate() that looks similar, but it just wraps checked exceptions in a RuntimeException, rather than a special subclass of RuntimeException.

Which approach is better? Should I not be using a special WrappedException as compared with a RuntimeException? My top-level code wants to know the topmost exception that adds informational value.

If I have a RuntimeException that wraps a NastyException that wraps a NullPointerException, the wrapping RuntimeException doesn't add informational value, and I don't care about it, so the error I would log would be the NastyException.

If I have an IllegalArgumentException that wraps a NastyException, the IllegalArgumentException does generally add informational value.

So in my top code that does error logging, I'd have to do something like this:

catch (RuntimeException re)
{
   logError(getTheOutermostUsefulException(re));
}

/** 
 * heuristics to tease out whether an exception
 * is wrapped just for the heck of it, or whether
 * it has informational value
 */
Throwable getTheOutermostUsefulException(RuntimeException re)
{        
   // subclasses of RuntimeException should be used as is
   if (re.getClass() != RuntimeException)
      return re;
   // if a runtime exception has a message, it's probably useful
   else if (re.getMessage() != null)
      return re;
   // if a runtime exception has no cause, it's certainly
   // going to be more useful than null
   else if (re.getCause() == null)
      return re;
   else
      return re.getCause();
}

The philosophy feels right for me, but the implementation feels bad. Is there a better way to handle wrapped exceptions?


related questions:

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2  
What does your top-level handling code do, apart from log? When you log the stack trace of a chained exception, you get the whole trace anyway, so it doesn't matter if it's wrapped or not. –  artbristol Jun 8 '11 at 21:31
    
If you're just logging, you're going to log everything anyway, and if you're doing some actual handling, then only catch or try to unwrap the exceptions you can handle. getCause is all you need for unwrapping. –  trutheality Jun 8 '11 at 21:47
    
@artbristol, @trutheality: Yeah, I thought about just calling logError() on the RuntimeException. But another part of logError() in my application is a display to the user, and I really need to display the most useful message without any noise; they're not going to wade through an exception stack to figure out what went wrong, instead they're going to look at the message, and if they can figure out the problem on their own, great, otherwise I get a complaint of "I got a RuntimeException, what do I do?" –  Jason S Jun 8 '11 at 21:55
    
Then it might make sense to put this code in the part of logError() that extracts the message to the user. –  trutheality Jun 8 '11 at 22:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Spring is the only library I know of with something relatively similar. They have nested exceptions: NestedRuntimeException and NestedCheckedException. These exceptions have useful methods such as getMostSpecificCause() or contains(Class exType). Their getMessage() method returns the cause's message (it's appended if the wrapping exception already has a message).

It's used in Spring's data access exception hierarchy. The idea is that each Database vendor exposes different exceptions in their JDBC drivers. Spring catches those and translates them into more generic DataAccessExceptions. Another benefit of this is that checked exceptions are automatically translated into runtime exceptions.

That being said, it's not very complicated code, and I'm sure you could do something similar in your code base. No need to add a Spring dependency just for that.

If I were you, I wouldn't try to "unwrap" the exceptions too soon, unless you really can handle them right then and there. I would let them bubble up (wrapped or not), with a global ExceptionHandler that would look at their causal chain, find the first "meaningful" exception, and extract an intelligent error message. When unable to do so, I would just print "technical error" and add the whole stack trace in the detail of the error message or in some kind of log, for bug reports purpose. You'd then fix the bug and/or throw a more meaningful exception instead.

Guava's Throwables.getCausalChain() might also be of interest to simplify exception handling:

Iterables.filter(Throwables.getCausalChain(e), IOException.class));

Edit:

I thought a little more about your problem, and I think you shouldn't really worry about wrapping your exceptions with a specific "WrapperException" type. You should wrap them using what makes the most sense: either a simple RuntimeException (Guava's Throwables.propagate() might be useful there), a RuntimeException with an additional error message, or a more meaningful exception type when appropriate.

Java's causal chain mechanism will let you get to the root cause anyway. You shouldn't need to worry about exception wrapping everywhere in your code. Write a global exception handler to manage it, and use standard exception bubbling everywhere else.

share|improve this answer

Use the standard JDK library java.util.concurrent.Executors framework. With it you can submit tasks run in threads and can find out if they threw exceptions etc. It's awesome.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks but that's not really what I'm asking. I'm using Runnable as one particular case here. –  Jason S Jun 8 '11 at 23:43

In general, it's best to avoid wrapping checked exceptions with an unchecked exception (see here and here). Some ways to get around it:

  1. Use Callable instead of Runnable
  2. Use the Executors framework like Bohemian suggested
  3. Subclass Runnable (or whatever interface/class you're using) and add some way to check for exceptions during the run after the fact, maybe a method public Exception getRunException() or similar.

If you must wrap a checked exception, I think the best way to do it is like you already do it, define a subclass of RuntimeException. But I'd try to avoid it if at all possible.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think Runnable was just an example to illustrate the need for wrapping checked exceptions. –  Steven Benitez Jun 9 '11 at 2:17
    
@Steven: yup, you got it –  Jason S Jun 9 '11 at 3:15
    
I see, I revised my answer –  Kevin K Jun 9 '11 at 19:59

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