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Using Google Closure Compiler (ADVANCED_OPTIMIZATIONS), it seems that when code is encapsulated in a function, there are certain advanced optimizations that cannot be done.

(function(){
var db = {};
/** @enum {number} */
db.col = { One: 0, Two: 3, Three: 4, Four: 1, Five: 2, Six: 7, Seven: 8 };
alert(db.col.Two); alert(db.col.Three); alert(db.col.Four);
})();

var db = {};
/** @enum {number} */
db.col = { One: 0, Two: 3, Three: 4, Four: 1, Five: 2, Six: 7, Seven: 8 };
alert(db.col.Two); alert(db.col.Three); alert(db.col.Four);

compiles to

var a={a:{f:0,d:3,c:4,b:1,e:2,h:7,g:8}};alert(a.a.d);alert(a.a.c);alert(a.a.b);
alert(3);alert(4);alert(1);

What is the reason that function encapsulation prevents the advanced variable substitution? Is there any way to do this such that both snippets compile to the same output?

share|improve this question
    
Which version of the compiler are you using? I also observe differences in treatment when code is in a closure vs. in the global scope. For example, prototype functions are not virtualized when defined in a closure, but will be virtualized when defined in the global scope. – Stephen Chung Jun 9 '11 at 3:56
    
I've tested latest SVN as well as a couple of the snapshots. But ya, it seems closures make a lot of the optimizations more passive. – user120242 Jun 9 '11 at 8:08
1  
Update now 2 years later. Current latest snapshot is now able to flatten above namespaces. – user120242 Jun 3 '13 at 12:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One possible explanation:

The feature of the Closure Compiler you are referring to is "namespace flattening", which is the compiler's attempt to circumvent costs related to lookups in long chains of namespaces.

For example, foo.bar.baz.hello.doSomething(); requires navigating a chain of four objects to find the doSomething property. With namespace flattening, the property is flattened to a, and the call is replaced by a(); -- a significant improvement.

Therefore, in your second case, it is not really the object db that is at issue. I believe the following chain of optimizations happens:

var db = {};
db.col = { One: 0, Two: 3, Three: 4, Four: 1, Five: 2, Six: 7, Seven: 8 };
alert(db.col.Two); alert(db.col.Three); alert(db.col.Four);

Flattening of namespace:

var a=0, b=3, c=4, d=1, e=2, f=7, g=8;
alert(b); alert(c); alert(d);

Then, since b,c,d are all used only once, they are in-lined:

var a=0, e=2, f=7, g=8;
alert(3);alert(4);alert(1);

Then finally, the unused variables a,e,f,g are discarded.

However, although this works fine in the global scope, the compiler must be extra careful when objects are defined inside a closure, because there may be function calls inside that closure that captures objects defined within that closure. Everything inside the closure must be "side-effect-free" in order for the compiler to "flatten" the objects and to eliminate the objects; otherwise code will break if the captured objects that an internal function call refers to are no longer there.

alert() is not assumed to be side-effect free. Therefore, it is assumed that db and db.col may be modified by the call to alert. Any code afterwards that is potentially not side-effect-free can refer to the modified db or db.col, so these objects must not be eliminated. Note: this does not apply if the alert() call is the last call that is non-side-effect-free.

To enable namespace flattening, you have to move the objects outside of the closure and define them in the global scope, which cannot be captured:

  1. Move the object definitions outside of the function closure (therefore making them namespaces)
  2. Avoid using object notation

This will work:

var db = {};    // Put the namespace outside, making it global
db.col = {};    // Put sub-namespaces outside also

(function(){
    db.col.One = 0;    // Avoid using object notation
    db.col.Two = 3;
    db.col.Three = 4;
    db.col.Four = 1;
    db.col.Five = 2;
    db.col.Siz = 7;
    db.col.Seven = 8;

    alert(db.col.Two); alert(db.col.Three); alert(db.col.Four);
})();

One good experiment is:

(function() {
    var db = {};
    db.col = { One: 0, Two: 3, Three: 4, Four: 1, Five: 2, Six: 7, Seven: 8 };
    alert(db.col.Two);   // Only one call
    var test = db.col.Three + db.col.Four;   // This statement is side-effect-free
})();

Lo and behold! It works:

alert(3);

However:

(function() {
    var db = {};
    db.col = { One: 0, Two: 3, Three: 4, Four: 1, Five: 2, Six: 7, Seven: 8 };
    alert(db.col.Two);     // First call, anything afterwards is suspect
    alert(db.col.Three);   // Oops!  Cannot eliminate db or db.col!
})();

does NOT work:

var a={a:{f:0,c:3,b:4,e:1,d:2,h:7,g:8}};alert(a.a.c);alert(a.a.b);
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting explanation. But a couple of things still bother me: var test = db.col.Three + db.col.Four; ends up being compiled out completely. If you use window.test = db.col.Three + db.col.Four; you get the same issue. When you say side effect free, do you mean it has no effect at all? Also, db.col is an "enum"; why can't CC recognize it as being non-changing? And it seems that even in the enclosure, only using a single property from db.col always allows it to flatten. Maybe you could provide an example of code that would break if it was flattened? – user120242 Jun 9 '11 at 7:53
1  
What code will break? Well, say if "alert" is redefined in a script loaded before the main script, and that new function walks the scope chain to find variables. Or in the case when var db is defined globally, it simply accesses the global variable. In these really wierd cases, alert may depend on the db and db.col objects being intact. I know, nobody really does that, but the compiler is not supposed to know! I do agree that if db is defined as a local variable in a closure, it would be pretty difficult for a redefined function to get at it... – Stephen Chung Jun 9 '11 at 10:18
1  
If you replace the second alert with a call to some global function not defined in "window", e.g. "parseInt", then it will work again. Which means that a built-in function defined under "window" are assumed to be not side-effect-free, but other JavaScript built-in functions are assumed to be side-effect-free. I believe there is a document on the Closure site describing what built-in functions are considered side-effect-free. – Stephen Chung Jun 9 '11 at 10:28
1  
Well, some JavaScript engines expose a "SCOPE" property or something that allows a program to walk up the scope chain. This is non-standard feature though. The problem with side-effects is that Closure is very conservative when it comes to functions that are not defined within the program. It simply assumes most of them to be potentially redefined, even though in 99.9% of the cases, nobody in his right mind will redefine "alert" etc. to have side effects. – Stephen Chung Jun 10 '11 at 9:13
1  
@user120242, as far as the current version of the compiler is concerned, most object-notation assignments are not optimized. Which means that if you assign prototype functions one by one, they'll be virtualized; but if you do it by assigning an object to the prototype, they won't be virtualized. AFAIK this is one of the main complaints about the compiler, and one of the hottest items on the wish list. – Stephen Chung Jun 13 '11 at 1:46

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