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  [DataContract]
  public class I<TId>
  {
    [DataMember(Order = 1)]
    public TId Id { get; set; }
  }

  [DataContract]
  public class J : I<int>
  {
    [DataMember(Order = 1)]
    public string Description { get; set; }
  }

  class Program
  {
    static void Main()
    {
      var o = new J { Id = 5, Description = "xa-xa", };
      using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
      {
        Serializer.Serialize(ms, o);
        ms.Position = 0;
        var o2 = Serializer.Deserialize<J>(ms);
        Debug.Assert(o.Id == o2.Id);
      }
    }
  }

Why does the assertion fail and how to fix it?

Thanks.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It fails because protobuf-net can't process inheritance unless you give it more of a clue either via attributes or a runtime type-model - essentially it needs to get a field number from somewhere (i.e. you). I am content to concede that maybe a trace warning might be useful in this case, since it is reasonably clear that there is probably more to this inheritance scenario than just J.

The following addition (at runtime) fixes it:

RuntimeTypeModel.Default.Add(typeof(I<int>), true).AddSubType(2, typeof(J));

(the only significance of 2 there is that it doesn't conflict with any other fields defined for I<int>).

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Why is there a need for this disambiguation? I understand the need for it, when the static type of the object being serialized is one of the base types, in which case the deserializer must know which derived type to instantiate. But here, the deserialized type is unambiguous, no? –  mark Jun 9 '11 at 5:11
    
@mark the emphasis isn't on the knowing - it is on the all-important field-number. Field-numbers rule the roost in protobuf (the google spec). I use them here are part of the "what is the actual type" resolution - is it a I<int>, a J, some subclass of J or some non-J subclass of I<int> –  Marc Gravell Jun 9 '11 at 6:10
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