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i'm trying to implement a category table. a simplified table description is like this

id -- name -- parent_id

assuming a sample data like

id - name - parent_id
1 test1  null
2 test2  null
3 test3  null
4 test4  1
5 test5  4
6 test6  2
7 test7  1

i'm struggling to come up with an sql query that will return record set in the following order

id - name - parent_id
1 test1  null
4 test4  1
5 test5  4
7 test7  1
2 test2  null
6 test6  2
3 test3  null

basically the child elements are returned after their parent element.

tanks in advance for any help.

----------------------- SOLVED BY USING LINQ/recursion in code -------------------------

not exactly an sql solution, but ultimately it works. Thanks for all the replies

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2  
I don't think there's enough specification. It seems arbitrary why test1 was the parent before test2, or test3 for that matter. –  Jason McCreary Jun 8 '11 at 23:36
2  
I might be missing the point. But I can't see the relation between the sample data and the order of the expected data. (It is late so if I'm missing the obvious I do apologise) –  lethalMango Jun 8 '11 at 23:37
    
test1 should be before test4 is he wants it ordered according to the parent relationship, it follows that test2 being the next id in a ordered list would be the next parent in the results –  Trey Jun 8 '11 at 23:38
2  
With a single query? no you cant. –  Ben Jun 8 '11 at 23:40
3  
This is a hierarchical query, and such things are notoriously difficult to code - whether in SQL or any other system. There are (standard-compliant) dialects of SQL which support a WITH clause and a WITH RECURSIVE clause. There are other dialects that support CONNECT BY clauses. Dealing with a 3-level hierarchy as in the question is not too hard; extending it to 4 levels is not too bad, either. One difficulty is knowing how many levels you need to support, and writing the SQL for each such level - hence the need for the recursive solutions. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 8 '11 at 23:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on what you are trying to do with the query, you don't need to sort it that way. You just need to ensure that the parents are created first. So run your query sorted by parent ID, put the result into an array and loop over that array. On each iteration do a check to make sure parent exists, if it has a parent. If parent doesn't exist, just move that item to the end of the array and go to the next for now, you should only end up with a few cases that get moved so it remains decently efficient.

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The query below works by added an extra order_parent column that contains either the parent id or the row's id, depending on whether it is the parent. It then just sorts primarily by the order_parent id to group them together, then by the parent_id to sort the nulls (actual parents) on top.

Two things:

  1. This has one more column that you originally wanted, so just ignore it.
  2. In case your database returns the nulls of parent_id last, add a DESC.

Good question, by the way!

SELECT   id,
         name,
         parent_id,
         (
             case
             when parent_id is null then id
             else parent_id
             end
         ) AS order_parent
FROM     myTable
ORDER BY order_parent, parent_id
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Have you run this query? It sorts children, but grandchildren (id=5) ends up last –  Bohemian Jun 9 '11 at 0:04
    
Ah, grandchildren. Quite. I didn't notice those. –  Justin Satyr Jun 9 '11 at 0:09
    
ya i tried to run it. It looks like it's about to work. but it's not working actually. For simplicity(to avoid the nulls) i copied ids to the parent id fields for the nodes that don't have a parent. –  robert Jun 9 '11 at 0:09
    
I can't think of a way to reconcile this to work for multiple levels of generations. Even if you got the root parent in order_parent, you wouldn't have something to sort by to get the grandchildren in the proper order. –  Justin Satyr Jun 9 '11 at 0:13
    
appreciate the effort nonetheless. I'll probably end up doing this via code. :( –  robert Jun 9 '11 at 0:24

Here is what I would do:

SELECT id, name, parent_id, (CASE WHEN COALESCE(parentid,0)=0 THEN id ELSE (parentid + '.' + id)) as orderid
FROM table
ORDER BY (CASE WHEN COALESCE(parentid,0)=0 THEN id ELSE (parentid + '.' + id))

This should create a new column called orderid that has the parentid dot the id (1.4, 4.5, etc.) For the columns where the parent id is null, it would put just the id. This way you would get the order as 1, 1.4, 4, 4.5, etc.

Please check the code since I wrote this on the fly without testing. It should be close.

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What I have always done in the past is split the database up into the following (I'm not the best at SQL though so there may be some other solutions for you).

categories
 - category_id  |  int(11)  | Primary Key / Auto_Increment
 ..
 ..

sub_categories
 - sub_category_id  |  int(11)  |  Primary Key / Auto_Increment
 - category_id      |  int(11)  |  Foreign Key to categories table
 ..
 ..
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